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John Collingwood Reade. Man of Valour, Winston Spencer Churchill A Critical Appreciation. Canadian Association of Broadcasters, 1941.

Price: US$7.50 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: 32 page pamphlet. A well produced tribute to Churchill, illustrated with photographs. The essays in this pamphlet are "Years of Preparation" about Churchill's family history, "Destiny Fulfilled" about his appointment as Prime Minister, and "A Study in Character." The booklet contains many photographs and speech excerpts. The condition is very good. The covers suffer no tears or losses, but do show some age toning and edge wear. The heavy, semi-gloss pages are clean and bright with some minor bending to the top corners. There is a contemporary plate on the inside of the front cover stating "Here is your CHURCHILL BOOKLET from Station CJOR Vancouver. Write this Station, enclosing 25c, for additional copies. Proceeds to Churchill Fund for British War Victims." The booklet is preserved in an archival quality protective sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Zoller A49

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

John Masefield. THE NINE DAYS WONDER. William Heinemann, London, 1941.

Price: US$16.94 + shipping

Condition: Fine

Description: THE NINE DAYS WONDER John Masefield. William Heinemann & Co Ltd., London 1941 Reprint 62pp plus plates and fold out map. This copy is in fine unmarked condition bright and tight. Bound in blue cloth covered boards with gilt titling to the spine. The unclipped dust wrapper is typically spotted and has a small 2mm area of loss to the base of the spine. The Dunkirk evacuation, code-named Operation Dynamo, also known as the Miracle of Dunkirk, was the evacuation of Allied soldiers from the beaches and harbour of Dunkirk, France, between 27 May and 4 June 1940. The operation was decided upon when large numbers of British, French, and Belgian troops were cut off and surrounded by the German army during the Battle of France in the Second World War. In a speech to the House of Commons, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill called the events in France "a colossal military disaster", saying that "the whole root and core and brain of the British Army" had been stranded at Dunkirk and seemed about to perish or be captured. In his We shall fight on the beaches speech on 4 June, he hailed their rescue as a "miracle of deliverance". This edition includes Masefield's stirring account of the salvation of the B.E.F. the involvement of the 'Little Boats' and includes the first appearance of four poems by the then Poet Laureate. Ref JJ2 Size: 62pp Plus Plates and Fold Out Map

Seller: Amazing Book Company, Liphook, United Kingdom

Churchill, Winston.. Blood, Sweat, & Tears.. Putnam, 1941., 1941.

Price: US$18.00 + shipping

Condition: Fine

Description: 462p. His speeches in the Commons May 1938 to February 1941. Red cloth. Heavy. Lettering bright. Fine Copy

Seller: Military Books, Washington, DC, U.S.A.

Churchill , Winston S.. Blood , Sweat , and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$20.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: Speeches, May, 1938 to February, 1941. Follows WHILE ENGLAND SLEPT.Includes the " Blood, Sweat, and Tears " speech as the title implies.

Seller: The History Place, Farmington, AR, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston S.. INTO BATTLE. Cassell, 1941.

Price: US$20.00 + shipping

Condition: Good

Description: 313pp. Frontis. "Winston Churchill's War Speeches." Compiled by Randolph S. Churchill. (loc 897/1)

Seller: Austin Book Shop, Richmond Hill, NY, U.S.A.

Churchill, Sir Winston S.. The War Speeches]. Blood, Sweat and Tears.. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1941., 1941.

Price: US$20.00 + shipping

Description: Book-of-the-Month Club edition. North American title of Into Battle . Brick red cloth lettered in gilt, decorated in blue, gilt and blind-stamping. Cream dust jacket printed in red and blue, very lightly soiled on spine. With flyer with WSC photo, re-printing the Book-of-the-Month Club News article on the book, laid in. Described by Langworth as "a rare example of a book club edition bound more nicely than its trade counterpart."

Seller: Wilfrid M. de Freitas - Bookseller, ABAC, Montreal, QC, Canada

Churchill, Winston S.. Blood, Sweat, and Tears. G. P. Putnam`s Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$22.00 + shipping

Description: Blood, Sweat, and Tears; With preface and notes by Randolph S. Churchill. Illustrated with a frontis photograph of the author. Churchill's speeches and writings at the beginning of the war. Published in Engliand under the title "Into Battle". 462 pages Size: Heavy-lourde

Seller: A Biblio-omnivore-Harvey Lev, parrsboro, NS, Canada

Churchill, Winston. Blood, Sweat & Tears.. Putnam’s, 1941., 1941.

Price: US$24.00 + shipping

Condition: Fine

Description: 462p. War speeches. Jacket missing one flap. Fine/Fair

Seller: Military Books, Washington, DC, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston S. [Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill], 1874-1965. Randolph S. Churchill, 1911-1968 (Preface, Notes). K.S. Woerner (dj rear panel illustrator). Cecil Beaton (frontispiece photographer).. BLOOD, SWEAT, AND TEARS. [American edition of "Into Battle."]. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons [Putnam], [April 14] 1941., 1941.

Price: US$25.00 + shipping

Description: American first edition (not stated per Putnam's contemporary practice). x, 462 pages. Hardcover: H 22cm x L 14.75cm. Tan dust jacket soiled with some staining, severe tearing to spine along its fold with front panel with rear panel detached, some chipping and tears at edges, past owner's ink signature at front flap's top left with original printed $3.00 price still present at top right, strong vertical crease to rear flap; dj now presented in a mylar Brodart protector. Dark blue cloth lightly rubbed; red and silver stamping to spine and front board with latter additionally decorated with debossed Churchill coat of arms at lower right. Muted red top edge; slight toning to deckle fore-edge. Some toning to endpapers strongest along gutters; interior pages are clean. Binding is firm. A very good+ copy in only a fair dust jacket. Features speeches made by Winston Churchill between May 1938 and February 1941. The British edition issued under the title INTO BATTLE precedes the American being published by London's Cassell and Company Ltd. in February 1941. Although the first American edition does not have internal illustrations (other than frontis portrait photo), Putnam's version is notable for including content omitted from the British and Canadian editions.

Seller: David Hallinan, Bookseller, Columbus, MS, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston.). MR. CHURCHILL IN OTTAWA.. [Public Information Department, Ottawa, 1941.], 1941.

Price: US$25.00 + shipping

Description: Unpaginated (approx. 20 pp.), 7 3/4" H, stapled in wraps. Several b&w photos of Winston Churchill addressing the Canadian Parliament and outside the Parliament buildings. The text of an address given by Winston Churchill on December 30th, 1941 to the Parliament of Canada. Introductory remarks by William Lyon Mackenzie King, Prime Minister of Canada. Interior - a few small light foxing marks - mainly in lower margin of last two pages, minor soiling, a few soft wrinkles to pages. Exterior - light edge wear on spine, one small corner crease, moderate rubbing/soiling on rear cover. VG-

Seller: Capricorn Books, Oakville, ON, Canada

Winston S. Churchill. Blood Sweat and Tears. McClelland & Stewart Limited, Toronto, 1941.

Price: US$25.00 + shipping

Description: This is the Canadian first edition of the first volume of the war speeches of Winston S. Churchill. Published in England as "Into Battle", this is one of the few Churchill first editions for which the U.S. and Canadian editions bear a different title than the British. The Canadian editions of Churchill's war speeches were published by McClelland and Stewart, Toronto. None of the Canadian first editions was reprinted and they are far more scarce than British or U.S. first editions. This unjacketed copy is in very good minus condition. The red cloth binding is square, tight, and clean with a modestly toned spine. The front cover gilt remains bright, the spine gilt dulled but still clearly legible. The text block features a rich red topstain and a clean, untrimmed fore edge. The contents are clean, bright, and free of marking and spotting. During his long public life, Winston Churchill played many roles worthy of note - member of Parliament for more than half a century, soldier and war correspondent, author of scores of books, ardent social reformer, combative cold warrior, Nobel Prize winner, painter. But Churchill's preeminence as a historical figure owes most to his indispensable leadership during the Second World War, when his soaring and defiant oratory sustained his countrymen and inspired the free world. Of Churchill, Edward R. Murrow said: "He mobilized the English language and sent it into battle." When Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953, it was partly " for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values." Between 1941 and 1946, Churchill's war speeches were published in seven individual volumes. In this first volume the great battle of the Twentieth Century and Churchill's life begins. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A142.2.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston. Blood, Sweat and Tears. Speeches.. McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, 1941.

Price: US$27.10 + shipping

Description: Compiled by Randolph S Churchill, M.P. 228 x 157mm, dull maroon cloth lettered & ruled in gilt on spine & upper cover, pp.[viii] 526, portrait frontispiece. Top edge dull maroon, fore-edges untrrimmed. Lacks front free endpaper, slight worming to covers & preliminaries, gilding dull.

Seller: Cameron House Books, Freshwater Bay, Isle of Wight, United Kingdom

Churchill, Winston S.. Blood, Sweat, and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$39.38 + shipping

Condition: Good

Description: 462, frontis illus.

Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Blood Sweat and Tears. McClelland & Stewart Limited, Toronto, 1941.

Price: US$45.00 + shipping

Description: This is the Canadian first edition of the first volume of the war speeches of Winston S. Churchill. Published in England as "Into Battle", this is one of the few Churchill first editions for which the U.S. and Canadian editions bear a different title than the British. The Canadian editions of Churchill's war speeches were published by McClelland and Stewart, Toronto. None of the Canadian first editions was reprinted and they are scarcer than British or U.S. first editions. Collectors should note the similarity in appearance between first Canadian editions such as this one, identified from pagination with the text ending on page 488, and the second Canadian edition. This copy is in very good minus condition in a good jacket. The red cloth binding is square, tight, and clean with sharp corners and some light shelf wear. The spine and front cover gilt are bright. The text block features a bright red topstain and a clean, untrimmed fore edge. We note a water line on the bottom of the front pastedown as well as the first few leaves. The contents are otherwise clean, bright, and free of previous ownership marks or spotting. The dust jacket is unclipped with overall browning, water stains on the front panel and spine, and some loss along the top edge including the top .5 inches of the rear panel. The dust jacket is preserved beneath a removable, archival quality clear cover. During his long public life, Winston Churchill played many roles worthy of note - Member of Parliament for more than half a century, soldier and war correspondent, author of scores of books, ardent social reformer, combative cold warrior, painter. But Churchill's preeminence as a historical figure owes most to his indispensable leadership during the Second World War, when his soaring and defiant oratory sustained his countrymen and inspired the free world. Of Churchill, Edward R. Murrow said: "He mobilized the English language and sent it into battle." When Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953, it was partly " for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values" as exemplified by his war speeches. Between 1941 and 1946, Churchill's war speeches were published in seven individual volumes. In this first volume the great battle of the Twentieth Century and Churchill's life begins. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A142.2, Langworth p.206

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Churchill , Winston S.. Blood , Sweat , and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$50.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: Speeches, May, 1938 to February, 1941 following the WHILE ENGLAND SLEPT volume. Previous owner's bookplate on inside front board and name and gift inscription on front endpaper. Otherwise, a very good copy .

Seller: The History Place, Farmington, AR, U.S.A.

Churchill , Winston S.. Blood , Sweat , and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$50.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: Speeches, May, 1938 to February, 1941 following the WHILE ENGLAND SLEPT volume. Includes the "Blood, Sweat, and Tears " speech. An excellent copy.

Seller: The History Place, Farmington, AR, U.S.A.

Churchill , Winston S.. Blood , Sweat , and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$50.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: Speeches, May, 1938 to February, 1941 following the WHILE ENGLAND SLEPT volume. Includes the " Blood, Sweat, and Tears "' speech. Previous owner's bookplate has been removed from inside front board, date remains. Otherwise, an excellent copy.

Seller: The History Place, Farmington, AR, U.S.A.

CHURCHILL, Winston S.]. Their Finest Hour". Speeches Broadcasts and Messages of Rt. Hon. Winston Churchill Since He Became Minister.. Saskatoon: Winnipeg Free Post:[c], First edition, Volume 1 of the series,, 1941.

Price: US$54.20 + shipping

Description: 8vo, 80pp, containing 21 speeches, orig. orange pictorial wrappers, lightly rubbed with a few light marks to extreme margins of wrappers. A VG copy.

Seller: Geoffrey Jackson, Royal Wootton Bassett, United Kingdom

CHURCHILL, Winston S. CHURCHILL, Randolph S, compiler. Blood Sweat and Tears. Cdn in dj. McClelland & Stewart, 1941,, 1941.

Price: US$59.45 + shipping

Description: CHURCHILL, Winston S. Blood Sweat and Tears : Speeches by the Right Honourable Winston S. Churchill, P.C., M.P. Compiled by Randolph S. Churchill, M.P. Tor.: McClelland & Stewart, (1941). Pp (4),v-viii,(2),3-488,frontis. 8vo, red cloth, t.e.stained red. Spadoni & Donnelly 1257. Name partially expunged, else vg in browned, rubbed and chipped dj. 75.00

Seller: John W. Doull, Bookseller (A.B.A.C.), Dartmouth, NS, Canada

Churchill , Winston S.. Blood , Sweat , and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$125.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: Speeches, from May, 1938 to February, 1941, following the WHILE ENGLAND SLEPT volume .Some soil to cloth chips to dust jacket . Dust jacket is protected with a mylar cover .

Seller: The History Place, Farmington, AR, U.S.A.

CHURCHILL, Winston S. CHURCHILL, Randolph S, compiler. Blood Sweat and Tears. Cdn in dj. McClelland & Stewart, 1941,, 1941.

Price: US$158.54 + shipping

Description: CHURCHILL, Winston S. Blood Sweat and Tears : Speeches by the Right Honourable Winston S. Churchill, P.C., M.P. Compiled by Randolph S. Churchill, M.P. Tor.: McClelland & Stewart, (1941). Pp (4),v-viii,(2),3-488,frontis. 8vo, red cloth, t.e.stained red. Spadoni & Donnelly 1257. Vg in lightly rubbed and nicked dj (one inch closed tear). 200.00

Seller: John W. Doull, Bookseller (A.B.A.C.), Dartmouth, NS, Canada

Winston S. Churchill and others. Addresses by Winston Churchill and Others at the Ninety-First Annual Commencement of the University of Rochester The first published appearance of Churchill's 16 June 1941 wartime broadcast address to the University of Rochester, his mother's birth city. University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, 1941.

Price: US$200.00 + shipping

Description: This scarce pamphlet is the first published appearance of Winston S. Churchill's speech of 16 June 1941, early in Churchill’s Second World War premiership and nearly half a year before the United States formally entered the war. The speech was broadcast from 10 Downing Street on the occasion of Churchill receiving an Honorary Degree of Laws from the New York State's University of Rochester. Churchill had assumed the Premiership just a year earlier on 10 May 1940. By 16 June 1941, Churchill had led his nation for a frightful, solitary year since the fall of France. Britain would continue to stand alone against Hitler's Germany until the United States formally entered the Second World War after the 7 December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Courting American empathy and support was of critical importance. In particular, severe merchant shipping losses to German U-Boats in April and May of 1941 were a spur "to press continually for a wider American contribution to Britain's war effort." (Gilbert, Vol. VI, p.111) Churchill's speeches conveyed the political determination of the British government and steadfastness of the British people to an American nation not yet fully engaged in the war. Given that Churchill’s mother was born in Rochester and Franklin Delano Roosevelt had served as Governor of New York State, this Broadcast address to a New York University, which might otherwise seem obscure, was a timely opportunity. In his speech Churchill spoke of "sense of kinship and of unity", and of his ancestral connection to Rochester. Nearly every sentence of Churchill's remarks limned common heritage, values, and purpose, all the while conveying British resolve to prevail: "For more than a year, we British have stood alone uplifted by your sympathy and respect, sustained by our own unconquerable will power and by the increasing growth and hopes of your massive aid. Whatever happens, we shall endure to the end." This speech was eventually published in His Complete Speeches as "The Old Lion". The title comes from the speech's penultimate paragraph: Now the old lion. stands alone against hunters who are armed with deadly weapons and impelled by desperate and destructive rage." The speech concludes striking the balance between Britain's resolve and urgent need: ".time is short. Every month that passes adds to the length and the perils of the journey that will have to be made. United we can save and guide the world." Clearly, the intended American audience was broader than Rochester. Four days later, on 20 June, Churchill telegraphed Roosevelt thanking him for establishment of trans-Atlantic "Ferry Service" using American Army pilots and American-manned staging posts with servicing facilities and assuring the President that "There will be no weakening here." The pamphlet measures 9.25 x 6 inches (23.5 x 15.25 cm), bound in wire-stitched, laid watermarked card wraps, both the front wrap and contents with untrimmed edges. The contents number 23 pages. Churchill's full address is printed at pages 7-9, preceded by his portrait photograph at page 6. The balance of the pamphlet contains a Foreword, the degree presentation by University President Alan Valentine, excerpts from an address by Eve Curie (daughter of Marie Curie), excerpts from an address by Robert P. Patterson (Roosevelt's Under Secretary of War), and a list of honorary degrees conferred in 1941. Condition is very good plus. The covers are complete and firmly attached, both binding staples rusted but tight. The covers show light soiling and spotting. This is an elusive item. This copy survived proximate to its source, coming to us courtesy of an upstate Upstate New York bookseller. Bibliographic reference: Cohen D80, Woods D(b)53/1.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill and others. Addresses by Winston Churchill and Others at the Ninety-First Annual Commencement of the University of Rochester The first published appearance of Churchill's 16 June 1941 wartime broadcast address to the University of Rochester, his mother's birth city. University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, 1941.

Price: US$220.00 + shipping

Description: This scarce pamphlet is the first published appearance of Winston S. Churchill's speech of 16 June 1941, early in Churchill’s Second World War premiership and nearly half a year before the United States formally entered the war. The speech was broadcast from 10 Downing Street on the occasion of Churchill receiving an Honorary Degree of Laws from the New York State's University of Rochester. Churchill had assumed the Premiership just a year earlier on 10 May 1940. By 16 June 1941, Churchill had led his nation for a frightful, solitary year since the fall of France. Britain would continue to stand alone against Hitler's Germany until the United States formally entered the Second World War after the 7 December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Courting American empathy and support was of critical importance. In particular, severe merchant shipping losses to German U-Boats in April and May of 1941 were a spur "to press continually for a wider American contribution to Britain's war effort." (Gilbert, Vol. VI, p.111) Churchill's speeches conveyed the political determination of the British government and steadfastness of the British people to an American nation not yet fully engaged in the war. Given that Churchill’s mother was born in Rochester and Franklin Delano Roosevelt had served as Governor of New York State, this Broadcast address to a New York University, which might otherwise seem obscure, was a timely opportunity. In his speech Churchill spoke of "sense of kinship and of unity", and of his ancestral connection to Rochester. Nearly every sentence of Churchill's remarks limned common heritage, values, and purpose, all the while conveying British resolve to prevail: "For more than a year, we British have stood alone uplifted by your sympathy and respect, sustained by our own unconquerable will power and by the increasing growth and hopes of your massive aid. Whatever happens, we shall endure to the end." This speech was eventually published in His Complete Speeches as "The Old Lion". The title comes from the speech's penultimate paragraph: Now the old lion. stands alone against hunters who are armed with deadly weapons and impelled by desperate and destructive rage." The speech concludes striking the balance between Britain's resolve and urgent need: ".time is short. Every month that passes adds to the length and the perils of the journey that will have to be made. United we can save and guide the world." Clearly, the intended American audience was broader than Rochester. Four days later, on 20 June, Churchill telegraphed Roosevelt thanking him for establishment of trans-Atlantic "Ferry Service" using American Army pilots and American-manned staging posts with servicing facilities and assuring the President that "There will be no weakening here." The pamphlet measures 9.25 x 6 inches (23.5 x 15.25 cm), bound in wire-stitched, laid watermarked card wraps, both the front wrap and contents with untrimmed edges. The contents number 23 pages. Churchill's full address is printed at pages 7-9, preceded by his portrait photograph at page 6. The balance of the pamphlet contains a Foreword, the degree presentation by University President Alan Valentine, excerpts from an address by Eve Curie (daughter of Marie Curie), excerpts from an address by Robert P. Patterson (Roosevelt's Under Secretary of War), and a list of honorary degrees conferred in 1941. Condition is near fine. The covers are complete and firmly attached, both binding staples intact and free of corrosion. The covers are remarkably clean apart from minor wrinkling to the bottom edge and a trivial hint of staining to the lower rear cover. The contents are pristine. This is an elusive item. Bibliographic reference: Cohen D80, Woods D(b)53/1.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Broadcast By The Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill To The Polish People, May 3, 1941 (Poland's 150th Constitution Day). British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$225.00 + shipping

Description: This is the first edition, only printing of Churchill's broadcast speech to the Polish people of 3 May 1941 on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the adoption of the Polish Constitution. This was a terrible time for Nazi-occupied Poland, but also for the United Kingdom, which was beleaguered on many fronts. The Blitz continued over Britain, merchant shipping losses in the Atlantic mounted, and there were imminent battles in Crete, Cyrenaica, and Iraq, with consequent threats to Egypt and the Middle East - all with the United States still more than half a year away from formally entering the war. May 3rd was relieved only by news of fighting in Tobruk. It was in this context that Churchill delivered his address to the Polish people, themselves suffering the fate of invasion and occupation that Britain had only narrowly avoided herself. "It is to you, Poles, in Poland who bear the full brunt of the Nazi oppression, at once pitiless and venal, that the hearts of the British and American democracies go out in a full and generous tie." Churchill's relationship with Poland would have its controversies. On 5 July, 1943, the Liberator bomber carrying General W adys aw Eugeniusz Sikorski, the preeminent Polish figure of the Second World War and leader of the Polish government in exile, crashed immediately after taking off from Gibraltar. Sikorski's death became a source of enduring speculation by conspiracy theorists, as the cause of Polish sovereignty, for which Sikorski had so persistently advocated, was a thorn in the side of relations between the American, British, and Soviet Allies. Churchill speaks of Sikorski in this 3 May 1941 speech: "It has been my privilege to come to know your Prime Minister and Commander-in-Chief General Sikorski, whose leadership, energy, and unfaltering confidence is a source of great encouragement to all who meet him." Sikorski's 1943 death proved a blow to Polish independence; Poland would be effectively ceded to the Soviet sphere of influence for the long Cold War that followed the Second World War. Despite the inconvenience of the Polish cause to Allied relations, Churchill had been publicly supportive of Sikorski and Poland. Moreover, Churchill is reported to have wept upon receiving the news of Sikorski's death (Official Biography of Winston Churchill, Volume VII, p.426) and on 6 July, 1943, Churchill gave a tribute to Sikorski in the House of Commons. Nonetheless, the conspiracy theories persisted after Churchill's death. This first edition, only printing of Churchill's 3 May 1941 speech is one of a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) This is a single leaflet, printed on both sides and measuring 9.125 x 6 inches. Most speeches in the series bear a front cover design featuring three vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top. This edition bears only the royal arms at the top right, plausibly owing to space needed to fit the entirety of the speech on the double-sided leaflet. Condition is very good. The leaflet is complete, with no losses. We note modest differential age-toning to .125 inch strips at the upper and right margins, a miniscule closed tear along the lower left margin, and very light creasing to the upper left. Protected in a removable, clear plastic

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech Broadcast by The Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill, April 27, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$245.00 + shipping

Description: This is the first edition, only printing of Churchill's broadcast speech of 27 April 1941 - Churchill's famous "Westward, Look, the Land is Bright" speech in which he praises the resolve and heroism of the British people. Churchill made the broadcast from Chequers, a rousing and reasoned reassurance to the British people delivered during retreat and evacuation from Greece under General Wavell. Churchill spoke of having recently visited "some of our great cities and seaports which had been most heavily bombed" and finding that "where the ordeal of the men, women and children has been most severe . I found their morale most high and splendid." Typically, even as he spoke of "an exaltation of spirit in the people" Churchill mixed practical information on the war and admonition that "There is only one thing certain about war, that it is full of disappointments and also of mistakes." Churchill spoke of fronts in Greece, Yugoslavia, Libya, and the Atlantic and of increased American commitment and support. The United States has recently passed the Lend Lease Act and extended its naval security zone several thousand miles into the Atlantic, effectively shielding much of the Atlantic convoy route. Churchill placed recent challenges in context, stating "Nothing that is happening now is comparable in gravity with the dangers through which we passed last year." Churchill famously concluded his remarks with eight lines of verse from a poem by Arthur Hugh Clough that Churchill first heard and learned by heart before the First World War. (Gilbert, Volume VI, p.1022). The moving words provided the title by which this speech came to be known. As a token of esteem, Charles Scribner, Churchill's former American publisher, located the manuscript version of the poem ("Say Not the Struggle Nought Availeth") and arranged to have it presented to Churchill in July 1941. (Cohen, volume I, pages 570-571) This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) This is an eight page pamphlet in self wraps, wire-stitched, measuring nine inches tall by six inches wide. As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring three vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. Condition of this copy is very good. The paper wraps show no losses, tears, or creasing. The covers are lightly soiled, with fractional wear at the upper right corner and a single previous owner name ("Elaine") inked at the top left of the front cover. The contents are clean with no spotting and no markings. The pamphlet is protected in a removable, clear plastic sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A145, Woods A70.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston S.. Speech Broadcast by The Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill, April 27, 1941. New York: The British Library of Information, 1941.

Price: US$250.00 + shipping

Description: 8pp. A fine, unmarked copy in wrappers.

Seller: Carpe Librum, Williamstown, MA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrims, January 9, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$250.00 + shipping

Description: This is the first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech to the Pilgrims Society (referred to as "the Pilgrims" in the title on the cover) welcoming Lord Halifax as British Ambassador to the United States. Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax (1881-1959) became British Ambassador to the United States after the sudden death of Lord Lothian in December 1940. Halifax, then the Foreign Secretary, was appointed only after both Lloyd George and Oliver Lyttelton had been considered, and is an example of the many personalities and considerations Churchill balanced in his wartime coalition government. In choosing the architect of Chamberlain's appeasement policy as ambassador to the one nation Britain most desperately needed to join the war, Churchill is reported as reasoning that Halifax "would never live down his reputation for appeasement which he and the Foreign Office had won themselves" and that "He had no future in this country. On the other hand he had a glorious opportunity in America, for, unless the United States came into the war, we could not win, or at least we could not win a really satisfactory peace." (Gilbert, Volume VI, pages 952-953) Halifax reluctantly accepted the appointment, allowing the return of Anthony Eden to the Foreign Secretary post, which he had resigned in 1938 in opposition to Chamberlain's appeasement policy. Halifax served as Ambassador to the U.S. until May 1946. In this address to the Pilgrims Society, Churchill calls Halifax "a man of light and learning" and, perhaps anticipating the effect of his new ambassador's pro-appeasement history, Churchill says: "I have often disagreed with him in the twenty years I have known him, but I have always respected him and his actions because I know that courage and fidelity are the essence of his being." Of the critical relationship between Britain and America, Churchill states: "The identity of purpose and persistence of resolve prevailing throughout the English-speaking world will, more than any other single fact, determine the way of life which will be open to generations, and perhaps to centuries, which follow our own." This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. As do most in the series, this example bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a royal arms device at the top right. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) This first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide and printed on the first three pages. This example is in near-fine condition. The leaflet is complete with virtually no wear. We note slight age-toning to the perimeter and a hint of spotting along the lower left edge of the front cover and two small spots on the rear cover. Protected in a removable, archival mylar sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A139, Woods A65

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrim Society, March 18, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$250.00 + shipping

Description: This leaflet is the first edition, only printing, of Churchill's 18 March 1941 address to the Pilgrims Society (erroneously printed as "Pilgrim Society" on the leaflet cover). Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Churchill addressed the Pilgrims Society on 18 March to welcome the new American Ambassador to the United Kingdom, John. G. Winant, in the wake of the passage of the Lend-Lease Act by the U.S. Congress. "We welcome you here, Mr. Winant, at a moment when the great battle in which your government and nation are deeply interested is developing its full scope and severity. Mr. Winant, you come to us at a grand turning point in the world's history." John "Gil" Gilbert Winant (1889-1947) was the 45th U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom. He succeeded the pro-appeasement Joseph Kennedy and marked a decidedly different, pro-Britain, pro-alliance perspective than his predecessor. Upon arriving in England on 2 March 1941, Winant announced "I'm very glad to be here. There is no place I'd rather be at this time than in England." Churchill would conclude his 18 March 1941 welcoming remarks to Winant "You, Mr. Ambassador, share our purpose. You'll share our dangers. You'll share our interests. You shall share our secrets. And the day will come when the British Empire and the United States will share together the solemn but splendid duties which are the crown of victory." Less than nine months after Churchill gave this speech, Winant was with Churchill when the latter learned of the attack on Pearl Harbor, precipitating formal U.S. entry into the war. Winant would serve as U.S. Ambassador until 1946. Winant reportedly had an affair with Churchill's daughter, Sarah. Both of Winant's sons served in WWII, John. Jr. as a B-17 pilot in the Eighth Air Force who became a prominent German prisoner of war. This first edition, only printing of Chuchill's 18 March 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide. This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. Condition is near-fine. The paper is bright with virtually no wear. We note only a hint of soiling along the left and bottom edges and a small rust stain at the lower left front cover where it apparently lay against another pamphlet, causing light offsetting. A collector-worthy copy of a speech from a critical time. Protected in a removable, archival mylar sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A144, Woods A68

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Text of Prime Minister Winston Churchill's speech to the Italian People, December 23rd, 1940. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$250.00 + shipping

Description: This pamphlet, from the personal collection of Churchill’s bibliographer, Ronald I. Cohen, is the first edition, scarce second issue of Churchill's December 23, 1940 address to the Italian People. The end of 1940 found Britain having escaped the imminent threat of invasion, but nonetheless beleaguered and pinning many hopes on the United States, which was still months away from approving the Lend Lease Act and nearly a year from formally entering the war. "With his thoughts focused on the many dangers in the Aegean and Mediterranean, Churchill broadcast on the evening of December 23 to the Italian People." (Gilbert, Volume VI, p.960). Churchill spoke from the Central War Room, assuring the Italian People of Britain's historic friendship with Italy and placing the blame for the conflict on Mussolini. "That he is a great man I do not deny, but that after eighteen years of unbridled power he has led your country to the horrid verge of ruin can be denied by none." Churchill read his exchange of letters with Mussolini from the previous May when he had appealed to the Italian leader not to pit Britain and Italy against one another. "Any one can see who it was that wanted peace and who it was that meant to have war." Churchill cast Mussolini as having sided with the Nazis to the detriment of his own people and concluded: "One man, and one man only, has led you; and there I leave this unfolding story until the day comes - as come it will - when the Italian nation will once more take a hand in shaping its own fortunes." This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) Most in the series bear a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a royal arms device at the top right. This copy is the scarce first edition, second issue, strikingly different in appearance from most BLOI pamphlets, featuring simply the title followed immediately by text on the front cover. This four page folded paper leaflet measures 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide. Condition is truly fine. The leaflet remains crisp and complete with no age-toning, no spotting, no soiling, no previous ownership marks, and virtually no wear. The pamphlet is protected in a removable, clear plastic sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A137.2, Woods A63

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrims, January 9, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$250.00 + shipping

Description: This item is from the personal collection of Churchill's bibliographer, Ronald I. Cohen. This is the first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech to the Pilgrims Society (referred to as "the Pilgrims" in the title on the cover) welcoming Lord Halifax as British Ambassador to the United States. Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax (1881-1959) became British Ambassador to the United States after the sudden death of Lord Lothian in December 1940. Halifax, then the Foreign Secretary, was appointed only after both Lloyd George and Oliver Lyttelton had been considered, and is an example of the many personalities and considerations Churchill balanced in his wartime coalition government. In choosing the architect of Chamberlain's appeasement policy as ambassador to the one nation Britain most desperately needed to join the war, Churchill is reported as reasoning that Halifax "would never live down his reputation for appeasement which he and the Foreign Office had won themselves" and that "He had no future in this country. On the other hand he had a glorious opportunity in America, for, unless the United States came into the war, we could not win, or at least we could not win a really satisfactory peace." (Gilbert, Volume VI, pages 952-953) Halifax reluctantly accepted the appointment, allowing the return of Anthony Eden to the Foreign Secretary post, which he had resigned in 1938 in opposition to Chamberlain's appeasement policy. Halifax served as Ambassador to the U.S. until May 1946. In this address to the Pilgrims Society, Churchill calls Halifax "a man of light and learning" and, perhaps anticipating the effect of his new ambassador's pro-appeasement history, Churchill says: "I have often disagreed with him in the twenty years I have known him, but I have always respected him and his actions because I know that courage and fidelity are the essence of his being." Of the critical relationship between Britain and America, Churchill states: "The identity of purpose and persistence of resolve prevailing throughout the English-speaking world will, more than any other single fact, determine the way of life which will be open to generations, and perhaps to centuries, which follow our own." This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. As do most in the series, this example bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a royal arms device at the top right. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) This first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide and printed on the first three pages. This example is in near fine plus condition. The paper is crisp, bright, and clean with no soiling, spotting, or previous ownership marks. We note only a barely discernible hint of wrinkling to the top edge. The leaflet is protected in a removable, clear plastic sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A139, Woods A65

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech Broadcast by The Prime Minister Mr. Winston S. Churchill, February 9th, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$250.00 + shipping

Description: This item is from the personal collection of Churchill's bibliographer, Ronald I. Cohen. This is the British Library of Information edition, only printing, of Churchill's famous "Give us the tools and we will finish the job" speech. On Saturday, February 8, 1941, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Lend-Lease Bill by 260 to 165 votes. It had yet to pass the Senate and be signed by President Roosevelt, but a major hurdle absolutely crucial to the British had been passed. Churchill learned of the welcome news at Chequers and later that day received a farewell visit from Harry Hopkins, President Roosevelt's emissary and a critical advocate and shaper of the Lend Lease Program. Hopkins discussed with Churchill many points in this speech that Churchill would deliver the following evening, which Hopkins noted had 'American public opinion' as 'the principle [sic] target'. (Gilbert, Volume VI, pages 1007-09) Churchill's February 9 broadcast to Britain and the Empire was his first broadcast in five months. Near the end of his remarks, Churchill quoted verse from a Longfellow poem which President Roosevelt had written out in his own hand and sent to Churchill on January 27: "Sail on, O Ship of State! / Sail on, O Union, strong and great! / Humanity with all its fears, / With all the hopes of future years, / Is hanging breathless on thy fate." Churchill concluded with his answer to President Roosevelt: "Put your confidence in us. Give us your faith and your blessing, and under Providence all will be well. We shall not fail or falter; we shall not weaken or tire. Neither the sudden shock of battle nor the long-drawn trials of vigilance and exertion will wear us down. Give us the tools and we will finish the job." The United States enacted the Lend Lease Act in early March and soon thereafter extended its naval security zone several thousand miles into the Atlantic, effectively shielding much of the Atlantic convoy route. This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. As do most in the series, this example bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a royal arms device at the top right. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) This pamphlet is 12 pages bound in wire-stitched wraps, measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide. Condition is near-fine. The pamphlet is crisp and complete with no creases or wear, no spotting, and no previous ownership marks. Both binding staples are firmly intact with no corrosion. What prevents our grading this pamphlet as fine is age-toning to the cover edges and a miniscule stain to the upper fore edge of the front cover. The pamphlet is protected in a removable, archival mylar sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A143.2, Woods A67 British Library of Information edition, only printing.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrim Society, March 18, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$275.00 + shipping

Description: This leaflet is the first edition, only printing, of Churchill's 18 March 1941 address to the Pilgrims Society (erroneously printed as "Pilgrim Society" on the leaflet cover). Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Churchill addressed the Pilgrims Society on 18 March to welcome the new American Ambassador to the United Kingdom, John. G. Winant, in the wake of the passage of the Lend-Lease Act by the U.S. Congress. "We welcome you here, Mr. Winant, at a moment when the great battle in which your government and nation are deeply interested is developing its full scope and severity. Mr. Winant, you come to us at a grand turning point in the world's history." John "Gil" Gilbert Winant (1889-1947) was the 45th U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom. He succeeded the pro-appeasement Joseph Kennedy and marked a decidedly different, pro-Britain, pro-alliance perspective than his predecessor. Upon arriving in England on 2 March 1941, Winant announced "I'm very glad to be here. There is no place I'd rather be at this time than in England." Churchill would conclude his 18 March 1941 welcoming remarks to Winant "You, Mr. Ambassador, share our purpose. You'll share our dangers. You'll share our interests. You shall share our secrets. And the day will come when the British Empire and the United States will share together the solemn but splendid duties which are the crown of victory." Less than nine months after Churchill gave this speech, Winant was with Churchill when the latter learned of the attack on Pearl Harbor, precipitating formal U.S. entry into the war. Winant would serve as U.S. Ambassador until 1946. Winant reportedly had an affair with Churchill's daughter, Sarah. Both of Winant's sons served in WWII, John. Jr. as a B-17 pilot in the Eighth Air Force who became a prominent German prisoner of war. This first edition, only printing of Chuchill's 18 March 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide. This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. Condition is near-fine plus. The paper is bright, crisp, and clean with no wear or spotting. We note only barely discernible creasing and minor rust stains to the rear along the spine where this unstapled leaflet apparently lay against another pamphlet, causing light offsetting. A superior copy of a speech from a critical time. Protected in a removable, clear sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A144, Woods A68

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrim Society, March 18, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$295.00 + shipping

Description: This leaflet is the first edition, only printing, of Churchill's 18 March 1941 address to the Pilgrims Society (erroneously printed as "Pilgrim Society" on the leaflet cover). Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Churchill addressed the Pilgrims Society on 18 March to welcome the new American Ambassador to the United Kingdom, John. G. Winant, in the wake of the passage of the Lend-Lease Act by the U.S. Congress. "We welcome you here, Mr. Winant, at a moment when the great battle in which your government and nation are deeply interested is developing its full scope and severity. Mr. Winant, you come to us at a grand turning point in the world's history." John "Gil" Gilbert Winant (1889-1947) was the 45th U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom. He succeeded the pro-appeasement Joseph Kennedy and marked a decidedly different, pro-Britain, pro-alliance perspective than his predecessor. Upon arriving in England on 2 March 1941, Winant announced "I'm very glad to be here. There is no place I'd rather be at this time than in England." Churchill would conclude his 18 March 1941 welcoming remarks to Winant "You, Mr. Ambassador, share our purpose. You'll share our dangers. You'll share our interests. You shall share our secrets. And the day will come when the British Empire and the United States will share together the solemn but splendid duties which are the crown of victory." Less than nine months after Churchill gave this speech, Winant was with Churchill when the latter learned of the attack on Pearl Harbor, precipitating formal U.S. entry into the war. Winant would serve as U.S. Ambassador until 1946. Winant reportedly had an affair with Churchill's daughter, Sarah. Both of Winant's sons served in WWII, John. Jr. as a B-17 pilot in the Eighth Air Force who became a prominent German prisoner of war. This first edition, only printing of Chuchill's 18 March 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide. This is one of a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. Condition is fine. The paper is bright, crisp, and clean with no wear, spotting, or previous ownership marks. A superior copy of a speech from a critical time. Protected in a removable, archival quality clear sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A144, Woods A68

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston. Broadcast Addresses to the People of Great Britain, Italy, Poland, Russia, and the United States, by the Prime Minister of the British Empire, Winston Churchill, MCMXL-MCMXLI. Ransohoffs [Printed by the Grabhorn Press], San Francisco, 1941.

Price: US$300.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: One of 250 copies, unnumbered, Elephant folio - over 15" to 23" tall, 63 pp. In addition to having been a highly-regarded (albeit somewhat controversial) Prime Minister of England and one who can justly claim a large part of the credit for helping the Allies win WWII, Winston Churchill (1874-1965) is also widely considered to have been one of the greatest speakers of the 20th century. Among his most famous speeches were those in 1940 when Churchill rallied the British nation with his words and optimism, a portion of which are presented in this volume. In addition he was a prolific writer, being awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for his overall body of work in 1953 (N. B. info from The National Churchill Museum website). ***DESCRIPTION: Bound in blue cloth and quarter natural linen, paper spine label with gilt lettering, coat-of-arms of the United Kingdom in blue and gold preceding the title page, quotation in blue and black following the title page ("Sail On, O Ship of State!" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow), initials, marginal titles and printer's device all in blue; hand-set in Goudy Modern on hand-made French paper, elephant folio size (approximately 15.5" tall), pagination: (i-iv), (1)-58, colophon (59); limited edition of 250 copies for the Ransohoffs printed by the Grabhorn Press. ***CONDITION: Very good overall, with a strong, square text block, solid hinges, the interior is bright and clean, entirely free of prior owner markings; some light soiling to the linen spine, spine label sunned, the first six pages have a shallow crease about halfway down the page (affecting the coat-of-arms and title pages only). ***CITATION: Heller & Magee no. 361. ***POSTAGE: Due to size, please note that additional postage may apply as the standard does not always cover costs; we are happy to ship at cost, please contact us for details. ***Swan's Fine Books is pleased to be a member of the ABAA, ILAB, and IOBA and we stand behind every book we sell. Please contact us with any questions you may have, we are here to help.

Seller: Swan's Fine Books, ABAA, ILAB, IOBA, Walnut Creek, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech Broadcast by The Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill, April 27, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$300.00 + shipping

Description: This is the first edition, only printing of Churchill's broadcast speech of 27 April 1941 - Churchill's famous "Westward, Look, the Land is Bright" speech in which he praises the resolve and heroism of the British people. Churchill made the broadcast from Chequers, a rousing and reasoned reassurance to the British people delivered during retreat and evacuation from Greece under General Wavell. Churchill spoke of having recently visited "some of our great cities and seaports which had been most heavily bombed" and finding that "where the ordeal of the men, women and children has been most severe . I found their morale most high and splendid." Typically, even as he spoke of "an exaltation of spirit in the people" Churchill mixed practical information on the war and admonition that "There is only one thing certain about war, that it is full of disappointments and also of mistakes." Churchill spoke of fronts in Greece, Yugoslavia, Libya, and the Atlantic and of increased American commitment and support. The United States has recently passed the Lend Lease Act and extended its naval security zone several thousand miles into the Atlantic, effectively shielding much of the Atlantic convoy route. Churchill placed recent challenges in context, stating "Nothing that is happening now is comparable in gravity with the dangers through which we passed last year." Churchill famously concluded his remarks with eight lines of verse from a poem by Arthur Hugh Clough that Churchill first heard and learned by heart before the First World War. (Gilbert, Volume VI, p.1022). The moving words provided the title by which this speech came to be known. As a token of esteem, Charles Scribner, Churchill's former American publisher, located the manuscript version of the poem ("Say Not the Struggle Nought Availeth") and arranged to have it presented to Churchill in July 1941. (Cohen, volume I, pages 570-571) This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) It is an eight page pamphlet in self wraps, wire-stitched, measuring nine inches tall by six inches wide. As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring three vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. Condition is near fine. The paper is bright, crisp, and clean showing no creases or wear. We note a .25 inch strip of slight differential toning to the right edge of the front cover and perhaps a hint of rust to the binding staples, but not enough to stain the adjacent paper. The pamphlet is protected in a removable, archival mylar sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A145, Woods A70

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrim Society, March 18, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$300.00 + shipping

Description: This leaflet is the first edition, only printing, of Churchill's 18 March 1941 address to the Pilgrims Society (erroneously printed as "Pilgrim Society" on the leaflet cover). Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Churchill addressed the Pilgrims Society on 18 March to welcome the new American Ambassador to the United Kingdom, John. G. Winant, in the wake of the passage of the Lend-Lease Act by the U.S. Congress. "We welcome you here, Mr. Winant, at a moment when the great battle in which your government and nation are deeply interested is developing its full scope and severity. Mr. Winant, you come to us at a grand turning point in the world's history." John "Gil" Gilbert Winant (1889-1947) was the 45th U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom. He succeeded the pro-appeasement Joseph Kennedy and marked a decidedly different, pro-Britain, pro-alliance perspective than his predecessor. Upon arriving in England on 2 March 1941, Winant announced "I'm very glad to be here. There is no place I'd rather be at this time than in England." Churchill would conclude his 18 March 1941 welcoming remarks to Winant "You, Mr. Ambassador, share our purpose. You'll share our dangers. You'll share our interests. You shall share our secrets. And the day will come when the British Empire and the United States will share together the solemn but splendid duties which are the crown of victory." Less than nine months after Churchill gave this speech, Winant was with Churchill when the latter learned of the attack on Pearl Harbor, precipitating formal U.S. entry into the war. Winant would serve as U.S. Ambassador until 1946. Winant reportedly had an affair with Churchill's daughter, Sarah. Both of Winant's sons served in WWII, John. Jr. as a B-17 pilot in the Eighth Air Force who became a prominent German prisoner of war. This first edition, only printing of Chuchill's 18 March 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide. This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. Here is an exceptional, truly fine copy. Condition is immaculate. The paper is bright, crisp, and clean with absolutely no wear, soiling, or creasing, and is protected in a removable, archival mylar sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A144, Woods A68

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrims, January 9, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$300.00 + shipping

Description: This is the first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech to the Pilgrims Society (referred to as "the Pilgrims" in the title on the cover) welcoming Lord Halifax as British Ambassador to the United States. Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax (1881-1959) became British Ambassador to the United States after the sudden death of Lord Lothian in December 1940. Halifax, then the Foreign Secretary, was appointed only after both Lloyd George and Oliver Lyttelton had been considered, and is an example of the many personalities and considerations Churchill balanced in his wartime coalition government. In choosing the architect of Chamberlain's appeasement policy as ambassador to the one nation Britain most desperately needed to join the war, Churchill is reported as reasoning that Halifax "would never live down his reputation for appeasement which he and the Foreign Office had won themselves" and that "He had no future in this country. On the other hand he had a glorious opportunity in America, for, unless the United States came into the war, we could not win, or at least we could not win a really satisfactory peace." (Gilbert, Volume VI, pages 952-953) Halifax reluctantly accepted the appointment, allowing the return of Anthony Eden to the Foreign Secretary post, which he had resigned in 1938 in opposition to Chamberlain's appeasement policy. Halifax served as Ambassador to the U.S. until May 1946. In this address to the Pilgrims Society, Churchill calls Halifax "a man of light and learning" and, perhaps anticipating the effect of his new ambassador's pro-appeasement history, Churchill says: "I have often disagreed with him in the twenty years I have known him, but I have always respected him and his actions because I know that courage and fidelity are the essence of his being." Of the critical relationship between Britain and America, Churchill states: "The identity of purpose and persistence of resolve prevailing throughout the English-speaking world will, more than any other single fact, determine the way of life which will be open to generations, and perhaps to centuries, which follow our own." This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. As do most in the series, this example bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a royal arms device at the top right. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) This first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide and printed on the first three pages. This example is in fine condition - crisp, clean, and bright with no wear. The only trivial flaw is a .25 inch rust stain offset from where we presume this leaflet once rested against a sister pamphlet with a lightly rusted binding staple. Despite this trivial flaw, a lovely copy. The paper is crisp, bright, and clean with no wear or soiling. Protected in a removable, archival mylar sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A139, Woods A65

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

WINSTON CHURCHILL. WINSTON CHURCHILL'S WAR SPEECHES. CASSELL AND COMPANY LTD, 1941.

Price: US$300.00 + shipping

Condition: Good

Description: 1ST BRITISH EDITION

Seller: Mima Mia Books, BROOKLINE, MA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech Broadcast by The Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill, April 27, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$350.00 + shipping

Description: This is the first edition, only printing of Churchill's broadcast speech of 27 April 1941 - Churchill's famous "Westward, Look, the Land is Bright" speech in which he praises the resolve and heroism of the British people. Churchill made the broadcast from Chequers, a rousing and reasoned reassurance to the British people delivered during retreat and evacuation from Greece under General Wavell. Churchill spoke of having recently visited "some of our great cities and seaports which had been most heavily bombed" and finding that "where the ordeal of the men, women and children has been most severe . I found their morale most high and splendid." Typically, even as he spoke of "an exaltation of spirit in the people" Churchill mixed practical information on the war and admonition that "There is only one thing certain about war, that it is full of disappointments and also of mistakes." Churchill spoke of fronts in Greece, Yugoslavia, Libya, and the Atlantic and of increased American commitment and support. The United States has recently passed the Lend Lease Act and extended its naval security zone several thousand miles into the Atlantic, effectively shielding much of the Atlantic convoy route. Churchill placed recent challenges in context, stating "Nothing that is happening now is comparable in gravity with the dangers through which we passed last year." Churchill famously concluded his remarks with eight lines of verse from a poem by Arthur Hugh Clough that Churchill first heard and learned by heart before the First World War. (Gilbert, Volume VI, p.1022). The moving words provided the title by which this speech came to be known. As a token of esteem, Charles Scribner, Churchill's former American publisher, located the manuscript version of the poem ("Say Not the Struggle Nought Availeth") and arranged to have it presented to Churchill in July 1941. (Cohen, volume I, pages 570-571) This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) This is an eight page pamphlet in self wraps, wire-stitched, measuring nine inches tall by six inches wide. As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring three vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. Condition is near-fine plus. The pamphlet is bright, clean, and crisp, with clean binding staples and showing no discernible wear or creasing. The sole flaw noted is a hint of differential toning along the lower left side and bottom right corner of the cover. An extremely clean copy withal. This copy is protected within a removable clear plastic sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A145, Woods A70

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. While England Slept. G.P. Putnam’s Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$395.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: This book is the precursor to Churchill's great war speeches. The British edition was given the politically palatable title "Arms and the Covenant". The U.S. title is a bit more honest. The book contains a collection of speeches spanning the years 1928 to 1938 criticizing British foreign policy and warning prophetically of the coming danger. The world remembers the resolute war leader to whom the British entrusted their fate, but it is easy to forget the years leading up to the war which Churchill spent persistent, eloquent, and largely unheeded. Churchill bibliographer Frederick Woods called this edition "probably the most crucial volume of speeches that he ever published". As testimony to the book's importance, a copy of While England Slept lay on "President Roosevelt's bedside table, with key passages, including an analysis of the president's peace initiative, underscored." (William Manchester's The Last Lion, Volume II, p.305). This is a bibliographically interesting copy - the orange cloth binding variant of the first U.S. edition, fourth and final printing. The fourth printing was issued in 1941 (despite the 1938 date on the title and copyright pages). Even though this final printing was only 1,000 copies, two different variants of both the dust jacket and the binding are known. The fourth printing bindings were issued in both a smooth blue cloth identical to the first, second, and third printings and a strikingly different coarse orange cloth unique to the fourth and final printing. Fourth printings came in two dust jackets - one identical to that of the third printing and another with changes to the rear face and rear flap. Here is the rare orange cloth binding variant of the first edition, fourth and final printing in its original third-printing style dust jacket. This copy is in very good plus condition, the dust jacket in very good condition. The orange cloth binding is square, tight, and unfaded with just a few minor scuffs and trivial corner wear. The contents are bright and clean with no spotting and no previous ownership marks. Faint transfer browning corresponding to the dust jacket flaps confirms that this copy has spent its life with this dust jacket. The top edge retains uniform, strong red color. The fore and bottom edges show mild soiling and age-toning. The dust jacket is unclipped, still bearing the original $4.00 front flap price. Modest wear is confined to extremities, with shallow, 1/8 inch losses at the spine ends and three vertical scratches to the front face. The spine is only mildly sunned, retaining strong red color. The dust jacket is protected in a removable, archival quality clear cover. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A107.2.d, Woods/ICS A44(b.4). Langworth p.193.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. While England Slept. G.P. Putnam’s Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$425.00 + shipping

Condition: Near Fine

Description: This book is the precursor to Churchill's great war speeches. The British Edition was given the politically palatable title "Arms and the Covenant". The U.S. title is a bit more honest. The book contains a collection of speeches spanning the years 1928 to 1938 criticizing British foreign policy and warning prophetically of the coming danger. The world remembers the resolute war leader to whom the British entrusted their fate, but it is easy to forget the years leading up to the war which Churchill spent persistent, eloquent, and largely unheeded. Churchill bibliographer Frederick Woods called this edition "probably the most crucial volume of speeches that he ever published". As testimony to the book's importance, a copy of While England Slept lay on "President Roosevelt's bedside table, with key passages, including an analysis of the president's peace initiative, underscored." (William Manchester's The Last Lion, Volume II, p.305). This is both a collector-worthy and interesting copy - the first U.S. edition, fourth and final printing. The fourth printing was issued in 1941 (despite the 1938 date on the title and copyright pages). Even though this final printing was only 1,000 copies, two different variants of both the dust jacket and the binding are known. Here is the variant bearing the same dust jacket as the third printing, and the same navy blue binding as the first printing. The book is in superb, near-fine plus condition, the dust jacket in very good plus condition. The book itself appears unread and almost untouched. The blue cloth binding is improbably tight, square, and clean, with sharp corners, perfect silver lettering and red banners, and virtually no wear. We note only a few tiny white marks near the lower rear corner. The contents are pristine - crisp, clean, bright, and tight with no spotting and no previous ownership marks. The white fore and bottom edges are immaculate. The red-stained top edge retains good color with just a few tiny spots of minor discoloration. Though not quite as perfect as the book beneath, the dust jacket is also a treat. The signal feature of this edition's dust jacket is the striking red, white, and black front face and spine. This fourth printing dust jacket bears the identical spine and front face as the first printing, differing only in the content of the white rear face and flaps. This dust jacket is bright and clean, featuring vivid, entirely unfaded red color on the jacket spine. The jacket is also unclipped, still bearing the original $4.00 price on the front flap. Minor losses are confined to the spine ends, with fractional chipping at the tail and to a maximum .25 inch depth at the head. Two short closed tears of one inch on the upper rear face and .75 inch on the lower front face and some minor creasing at the upper front face are the only other flaws noted. The dust jacket is protected in a removable, archival quality clear cover. This jacket and binding appear identical to the first printing on the shelf but command a fraction of the price of what a similarly collector-worthy first printing would cost. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A107.2.d, Woods/ICS A44(b.4). Langworth p.193.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Broadcast By The Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill To The Polish People, May 3, 1941 (Poland's 150th Constitution Day), a pristine copy in the original franked wartime envelope, accompanied by the May 21, 1941 Bulletins from Britain Supplement and an unused order form for the Air Ministry Record of the Battle of Britain. British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$550.00 + shipping

Description: This compelling Second World War time capsule testifies to the vigorous campaign by Churchill’s Britain to win American empathy and support. Within an original, franked "Bulletins from Britain" mailing envelope we discovered a pristine copy of the first edition, only printing of Churchill's broadcast speech to the Polish people of 3 May 1941 on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the adoption of the Polish Constitution. The fragile, leaflet publication is the best-preserved copy we have encountered. The envelope also includes an original order form for the U.S. edition of The Battle of Britain (the 1941 official report of the British Air Ministry to the British people) as well as a four-page pamphlet titled "Bulletins from Britain SUPPLEMENT" (Number 38) dated "May 21, 1941". The SUPPLEMENT bulletin is in fine condition, with just a few faint corner creases. The order form for The Battle of Britain is creased at the upper right corner with a tiny blemish at the lower left corner. The original postmarked envelope is age-toned, but fully intact. Churchill's broadcast speech to the Polish people of 3 May 1941 was delivered during a terrible time for Nazi-occupied Poland, but also for a beleaguered Britain. The Blitz continued over Britain, merchant shipping losses in the Atlantic mounted, and there were imminent battles in Crete, Cyrenaica, and Iraq, with consequent threats to Egypt and the Middle East - all with the United States still more than half a year away from formally entering the war. The Polish people were suffering the fate of invasion and occupation that Britain had only narrowly avoided. "It is to you, Poles, in Poland who bear the full brunt of the Nazi oppression, at once pitiless and venal, that the hearts of the British and American democracies go out in a full and generous tie." Churchill's relationship with Poland would have its controversies. On 5 July, 1943, the Liberator bomber carrying General W adys aw Eugeniusz Sikorski, the preeminent Polish figure of the Second World War and leader of the Polish government in exile, crashed immediately after taking off from Gibraltar. Sikorski's death fueled conspiracy theories, as the cause of Polish sovereignty, for which Sikorski advocated, was a thorn in the side of relations between the American, British, and Soviet Allies; Poland would be effectively ceded to the Soviet sphere of influence for the long Cold War that followed the Second World War. Churchill speaks of Sikorski in this 3 May 1941 speech: "It has been my privilege to come to know your Prime Minister and Commander-in-Chief General Sikorski, whose leadership, energy, and unfaltering confidence is a source of great encouragement to all who meet him." This first edition, only printing of Churchill's 3 May 1941 speech is one of a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) This is a single leaflet, printed on both sides and measuring 9.125 x 6 inches. Most speeches in the series bear a front cover design featuring three vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top. This edition bears only the Royal arms at the top right, plausibly owing to space needed to fit the entirety of the speech on the double-sided leaflet. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A146, Woods A71.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston. Broadcast Addresses To The People Of Great Britain, Italy, Poland, Russia And The United States, By The Prime Minister Of The British Empire, Winston Churchill Mcmxl- Mcmxli. Ransohoffs / Grabhorn Press, San Francisco, 1941.

Price: US$750.00 + shipping

Condition: Fine

Description: First Printing In Book Form Of The Prime Minister's Famous War Speeches. One Of 250 Copies Printed By The Grabhorns (For Ransohoffs, San Francisco). White Linen Spine With Gilt Leather Spine Label, And Blue Cloth Boards. Finely Printed By The Grabhorns On Fine Paper With Deckled Edges. 16" X 10 3/4". A Fine Copy, No Wear Or Foxing Or Stains, Spine Label Complete And With Brilliant Gilt. Traces Of Rubbing Right Along Top And Bottom Edges Of Boards. Clear Dj Is 3/16" Taller Than Book, No Wear Or Tears Or Chips.

Seller: Arroyo Seco Books, Pasadena, Member IOBA, Pasadena, CA, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston. Broadcast Addresses to the People of Great Britain. 1940-1941.. , 1941.

Price: US$775.00 + shipping

Description: CHURCHILL, Winston S. Broadcast Addresses to the People of Great Britain, Italy, Poland, Russia and the United States. [6], 57, [2] pp., arms of Great Britain on half-title. Folio, 404 x 274 mm, bound in recent half morocco. San Francisco: Printed for Ransohoffs by the Grabhorn Press, 1941. This Fine Grabhorn Press Edition prints six important speeches of Winston Churchill delivered at the onset of World War II. The dates of the broadcasts range from December 23, 1940 to June 22, 1941, and thereby represent crucial communications from England to the Italian peoples, the British Nation and Empire, a broadcast to Polish peoples around the world, two general reports on the War, and a report on the Atlantic Meeting. Limited to 250 copies, printed in blue and black on hand-made paper. With large six-line initials in gold and blue and the blue and gold crest of England on the half-title. Being printed by the Grabhorn's within months of the final broadcast, this publication has to be one of the earliest to appear either in this country or England, and it is certainly the most elegantly printed of any subsequent edition. Woods D(a)8, containing Addresses A63, A67, A70, A71, A74, A76 (c).

Seller: Ursus Rare Books, New York, NY, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. The War Speeches, British first editions - Into Battle, The Unrelenting Struggle, The End of the Beginning, Onwards to Victory, The Dawn of Liberation, Victory, and Secret Session Speeches. Cassell and Company Ltd., London, 1941.

Price: US$1850.00 + shipping

Description: This is a full, seven volume set of British first edition, first printings of Winston Churchill's war speeches volumes. This set features very good volumes in very good dust jackets. First printing sets have become challenging to assemble thus. Few books are as emblematic of Churchill’s literary and leadership gifts as his war speeches volumes. During his long public life, Winston Churchill played many roles worthy of note - Member of Parliament for more than half a century, soldier and war correspondent, author of scores of books, ardent social reformer, combative cold warrior, Nobel Prize winner, painter. But Churchill's preeminence as a historical figure owes most to his indispensable leadership during the Second World War, when his soaring and defiant oratory sustained his countrymen and inspired the free world. Of Churchill, Edward R. Murrow said: "He mobilized the English language and sent it into battle." When Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953, it was partly " for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values." Between 1941 and 1946, Churchill's war speeches were published in seven individual volumes. The British first editions are visually striking, but were printed on cheap wartime paper, bound in coarse cloth, and wrapped in bright, fragile dust jackets. They proved highly susceptible to spotting, soiling, and fading, so the passage of time has been hard on most surviving first editions. This collector-worthy set has suffered some age and wear, but is nonetheless superior to most we see. The blue cloth bindings remain tight, bright, and clean with negligible wear. The contents are quite respectably bright and clean given the cheap, wartime paper of these first editions. We find no previous ownership marks of any kind in the set. Spotting is primarily confined to page edges and the prelims of a few volumes, notably absent from the main text throughout. Victory is also first state, denoted by incorrect pagination at page 177. The first printing dust jackets all retain unusually bright spines including Into Battle, which has been spared the customary spine toning. Six of the seven dust jackets retain the original front flap prices, with only the lower front flap of Onwards to Victory neatly price-clipped. The jackets all show mild to moderate edge wear to hinges and extremities, with fractional chipping to some, mostly at the spine ends. Nonetheless, the jackets are bright, substantially complete, and present quite well on the shelf. All seven dust jackets are newly fitted with removable, archival quality clear covers. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A142.1.b, A172.1.b, A183.1.a, A194.1.a, A214.1.a, A223.1.a, A227.2.a; Woods/ICS A66(a.1), A89(a.1), A94(a.1), A101(a.1), A107(a.1), A112(ab), A114(b); Langworth pages 204, 213, 218, 223, 228, 234, 250.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. The War Speeches, a full set of seven British first editions - Into Battle, The Unrelenting Struggle, The End of the Beginning, Onwards to Victory, The Dawn of Liberation, Victory, and Secret Session Speeches. Cassell and Company Ltd., London, 1941.

Price: US$3000.00 + shipping

Description: Here is an exceptional set of British first edition, first printings of Winston Churchill's seven war speeches volumes. This set features near fine or better volumes in near fine dust jackets. It has become quite difficult to assemble jacketed, first printing sets in such condition. Few books are as emblematic of Churchill’s literary and leadership gifts as his war speeches volumes. During his long public life, Winston Churchill played many roles worthy of note - Member of Parliament for more than half a century, soldier and war correspondent, author of scores of books, ardent social reformer, combative cold warrior, Nobel Prize winner, painter. But Churchill's preeminence as a historical figure owes most to his indispensable leadership during the Second World War, when his soaring and defiant oratory sustained his countrymen and inspired the free world. Of Churchill, Edward R. Murrow said: "He mobilized the English language and sent it into battle." When Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953, it was partly " for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values." Between 1941 and 1946, Churchill's war speeches were published in seven individual volumes. The British first editions are visually striking, but were printed on cheap wartime paper, bound in coarse cloth, and wrapped in bright, fragile dust jackets. They proved highly susceptible to spotting, soiling, and fading, so the passage of time has been hard on most surviving first editions. This set is a noteworthy exception. The blue cloth bindings remain tight and clean with bright spine gilt and only trivial wear to extremities. The contents are unusually bright throughout the set. We find no previous ownership marks in any of the volumes. The spotting endemic to these first editions appears confined to the page edges of the first volume and the page edges and first and final leaves of the fourth and fifth volumes. The Unrelenting Struggle is also first state, denoted by irregular pagination at page 281. Victory is likewise first state, denoted by p.177 misprinted as "77". The first and final volumes are of special note. Into Battle has the most vividly bright and complete dust jacket we have been able to offer in many years, with a beautifully bright book beneath suffering only a bit of page edge spotting. Secret Session Speeches is likewise a superlative copy, with beautifully fine book beneath a complete and unusually bright dust jacket. All seven first printing dust jackets retain unusually bright spines. All dust jackets except The Unrelenting Struggle retain the original publisher’s prices on the lower front flaps. All seven dust jackets are complete apart from fractional chipping to a few extremities. Modest soiling, primarily to the white rear faces of the dust jackets, trivial wear to hinges and extremities, and a tiny, stray ink mark to the front face of Victory jacket do not compromise the exceptional shelf presentation and overall caliber of this set. All seven dust jackets are newly fitted with removable, archival quality clear covers. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A142.1.b, A172.1.a, A183.1.a, A194.1.a, A214.1.a, A223.1.a, A227.2.b; Woods/ICS A66(a.1), A89(a.1), A94(a.1), A101(a.1), A107(a.1), A112(ab), A114(b); Langworth pages 204, 213, 218, 223, 228, 234, 250.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.