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John Masefield. THE NINE DAYS WONDER. William Heinemann, London, 1941.

Price: US$16.92 + shipping

Condition: Fine

Description: THE NINE DAYS WONDER John Masefield. William Heinemann & Co Ltd., London 1941 Reprint 62pp plus plates and fold out map. This copy is in fine unmarked condition bright and tight. Bound in blue cloth covered boards with gilt titling to the spine. The unclipped dust wrapper is typically spotted and has a small 2mm area of loss to the base of the spine. The Dunkirk evacuation, code-named Operation Dynamo, also known as the Miracle of Dunkirk, was the evacuation of Allied soldiers from the beaches and harbour of Dunkirk, France, between 27 May and 4 June 1940. The operation was decided upon when large numbers of British, French, and Belgian troops were cut off and surrounded by the German army during the Battle of France in the Second World War. In a speech to the House of Commons, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill called the events in France "a colossal military disaster", saying that "the whole root and core and brain of the British Army" had been stranded at Dunkirk and seemed about to perish or be captured. In his We shall fight on the beaches speech on 4 June, he hailed their rescue as a "miracle of deliverance". This edition includes Masefield's stirring account of the salvation of the B.E.F. the involvement of the 'Little Boats' and includes the first appearance of four poems by the then Poet Laureate. Ref JJ2 Size: 62pp Plus Plates and Fold Out Map

Seller: Amazing Book Company, Liphook, United Kingdom

Churchill, Winston.. Blood, Sweat, & Tears.. Putnam, 1941., 1941.

Price: US$18.00 + shipping

Condition: Fine

Description: 462p. His speeches in the Commons May 1938 to February 1941. Red cloth. Heavy. Lettering bright. Fine Copy

Seller: Military Books, Washington, DC, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston S.. Blood, Sweat, And Tears. McClelland & Stewart Limited, Toronto, 1941.

Price: US$19.50 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: NAP. Light bumping to spine extremities and top corners. Previous owner's name and date on front flyleaf. Rubbing with short tears in DJ spine extremities and corners. 1/4" chip in rear top DJ corner. Some rubbing to DJ flap folds and down spine edges. Some edgewear with a few 1/2" mostly closed tears to dj. ; 525 pages

Seller: Crossroad Books, Eau Claire, WI, U.S.A.

Churchill , Winston S.. Blood , Sweat , and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$20.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: Speeches, May, 1938 to February, 1941. Follows WHILE ENGLAND SLEPT.Includes the " Blood, Sweat, and Tears " speech as the title implies.

Seller: The History Place, Palestine, TX, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston S.. INTO BATTLE. Cassell, 1941.

Price: US$20.00 + shipping

Condition: Good

Description: 313pp. Frontis. "Winston Churchill's War Speeches." Compiled by Randolph S. Churchill. (loc 897/1)

Seller: Austin Book Shop, Richmond Hill, NY, U.S.A.

Churchill, Sir Winston S.. The War Speeches]. Blood, Sweat and Tears.. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1941., 1941.

Price: US$20.00 + shipping

Description: Book-of-the-Month Club edition. North American title of Into Battle . Brick red cloth lettered in gilt, decorated in blue, gilt and blind-stamping. Cream dust jacket printed in red and blue, very lightly soiled on spine. With flyer with WSC photo, re-printing the Book-of-the-Month Club News article on the book, laid in. Described by Langworth as "a rare example of a book club edition bound more nicely than its trade counterpart."

Seller: Wilfrid M. de Freitas - Bookseller, ABAC, Montreal, QC, Canada

Churchill, Winston S.. Blood, Sweat, and Tears. G. P. Putnam`s Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$21.56 + shipping

Description: Blood, Sweat, and Tears; With preface and notes by Randolph S. Churchill. Illustrated with a frontis photograph of the author. Churchill's speeches and writings at the beginning of the war. Published in Engliand under the title "Into Battle". 462 pages Size: Heavy-lourde

Seller: A Biblio-omnivore-Harvey Lev, parrsboro, NS, Canada

Churchill, Winston. Blood, Sweat & Tears.. Putnam’s, 1941., 1941.

Price: US$24.00 + shipping

Condition: Fine

Description: 462p. War speeches. Jacket missing one flap. Fine/Fair

Seller: Military Books, Washington, DC, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston.). MR. CHURCHILL IN OTTAWA.. [Public Information Department, Ottawa, 1941.], 1941.

Price: US$25.00 + shipping

Description: Unpaginated (approx. 20 pp.), 7 3/4" H, stapled in wraps. Several b&w photos of Winston Churchill addressing the Canadian Parliament and outside the Parliament buildings. The text of an address given by Winston Churchill on December 30th, 1941 to the Parliament of Canada. Introductory remarks by William Lyon Mackenzie King, Prime Minister of Canada. Interior - a few small light foxing marks - mainly in lower margin of last two pages, minor soiling, a few soft wrinkles to pages. Exterior - light edge wear on spine, one small corner crease, moderate rubbing/soiling on rear cover. VG-

Seller: Capricorn Books, Oakville, ON, Canada

Churchill, Winston S.. Blood, Sweat, and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$39.38 + shipping

Condition: Good

Description: 462, frontis illus.

Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.

Churchill , Winston S.. Blood , Sweat , and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$50.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: Speeches, May, 1938 to February, 1941 following the WHILE ENGLAND SLEPT volume. Previous owner's bookplate on inside front board and name and gift inscription on front endpaper. Otherwise, a very good copy .

Seller: The History Place, Palestine, TX, U.S.A.

Churchill , Winston S.. Blood , Sweat , and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$50.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: Speeches, May, 1938 to February, 1941 following the WHILE ENGLAND SLEPT volume. Includes the "Blood, Sweat, and Tears " speech. An excellent copy.

Seller: The History Place, Palestine, TX, U.S.A.

Churchill , Winston S.. Blood , Sweat , and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$50.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: Speeches, May, 1938 to February, 1941 following the WHILE ENGLAND SLEPT volume. Includes the " Blood, Sweat, and Tears "' speech. Previous owner's bookplate has been removed from inside front board, date remains. Otherwise, an excellent copy.

Seller: The History Place, Palestine, TX, U.S.A.

British Library of Information. Air Raid Precautions. British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$50.00 + shipping

Description: This Second World War leaflet describes Britain’s air raid procedures as part of the British Library of Information’s continued attempt to inform and sway the American people. Though no publication date is stated, WorldCat lists this as a 1941 publication, produced before America entered the war. The text is printed on both sides of a single piece of paper that was folded in half to create a large, four-page leaflet. Condition is very good given the age, size, and inherent fragility. The paper is bright and crisp with some browning to the edges of the first page, some light soiling to the rear cover, two short closed tears to the fore-edge, and a horizontal crease through the center. The rear cover is a secondary bit of history, advertising other British Library of Information publications "Available upon Request" including "Women’s War Work", "Britain in Time of War", "Britain’s Blockade", "The British System of Social Security", "Compulsory Military Service in Great Britain", and a number of "Speeches by the Prime Minister Winston Churchill". Late 1940 or early 1941 publication is substantiated by the fact that the final Churchill speech publication offered is that of 5 November 1940. The British Library of Information was a branch of the British Foreign Office created in 1919 as a means of both monitoring and cultivating the relationship between the United States and Great Britain. During the Second World War, the agency produced dozens of pamphlets, leaflets, posters, and other pieces of propaganda to distribute in America with the intent to "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the prime minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513) Although Churchill would secure significant American material aid and forge a vital bond with President Roosevelt, America would not formally enter the war until after the 7 December 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. When Churchill became Prime Minister on 10 May 1940, the war for Britain was not so much a struggle for victory as a struggle to survive. Churchill’s first year in office saw, among other near-calamities, the Battle of the Atlantic, the fall of France, evacuation at Dunkirk, and the Battle of Britain. Engaging the sympathy and comity of the American people was not mere propaganda, but a dire necessity. In 1942, following America’s formal entry into the war, The British Library of Information was absorbed by British Information Services (BIS), the information department of the British Consulate in New York.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

CHURCHILL, Winston S.]. Their Finest Hour". Speeches Broadcasts and Messages of Rt. Hon. Winston Churchill Since He Became Minister.. Saskatoon: Winnipeg Free Post:[c], First edition, Volume 1 of the series,, 1941.

Price: US$54.13 + shipping

Description: 8vo, 80pp, containing 21 speeches, orig. orange pictorial wrappers, lightly rubbed with a few light marks to extreme margins of wrappers. A VG copy.

Seller: Geoffrey Jackson, Royal Wootton Bassett, United Kingdom

CHURCHILL, Winston S. CHURCHILL, Randolph S, compiler. Blood Sweat and Tears. Cdn in dj. McClelland & Stewart, 1941,, 1941.

Price: US$58.27 + shipping

Description: CHURCHILL, Winston S. Blood Sweat and Tears : Speeches by the Right Honourable Winston S. Churchill, P.C., M.P. Compiled by Randolph S. Churchill, M.P. Tor.: McClelland & Stewart, (1941). Pp (4),v-viii,(2),3-488,frontis. 8vo, red cloth, t.e.stained red. Spadoni & Donnelly 1257. Name partially expunged, else vg in browned, rubbed and chipped dj. 75.00

Seller: John W. Doull, Bookseller (A.B.A.C.), Dartmouth, NS, Canada

Churchill , Winston S.. Blood , Sweat , and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$125.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: Speeches, from May, 1938 to February, 1941, following the WHILE ENGLAND SLEPT volume .Some soil to cloth chips to dust jacket . Dust jacket is protected with a mylar cover .

Seller: The History Place, Palestine, TX, U.S.A.

CHURCHILL, Winston S. CHURCHILL, Randolph S, compiler. Blood Sweat and Tears. Cdn in dj. McClelland & Stewart, 1941,, 1941.

Price: US$155.38 + shipping

Description: CHURCHILL, Winston S. Blood Sweat and Tears : Speeches by the Right Honourable Winston S. Churchill, P.C., M.P. Compiled by Randolph S. Churchill, M.P. Tor.: McClelland & Stewart, (1941). Pp (4),v-viii,(2),3-488,frontis. 8vo, red cloth, t.e.stained red. Spadoni & Donnelly 1257. Vg in lightly rubbed and nicked dj (one inch closed tear). 200.00

Seller: John W. Doull, Bookseller (A.B.A.C.), Dartmouth, NS, Canada

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill. Blood, Sweat, and Tears. G. P. Putnam's Sons., c.1941., New York, 1941.

Price: US$175.00 + shipping

Description: contemporary full red gilt cloth board., The phrase "blood, toil, tears, and sweat" became famous in a speech given by Winston Churchill to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom on 13 May 1940; a speech on 13 May 1940 to the House of Commons after having been offered the King's commission the previous Friday, to become Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the first year of World War II. Churchill had replaced Neville Chamberlain on 10 May, and in this speech he asked the House to declare its confidence in his Government. The motion passed unanimously. This was the first of three speeches which he gave during the period of the Battle of France, which commenced on 10 May.Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, DL, FRS, RA (1874 ? 1965) was a British politician, army officer, and writer. He was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945, when he led Britain to victory in the Second World War, and again from 1951 to 1955. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as a Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and imperialist, for most of his career he was a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but from 1904 to 1924 was instead a member of the Liberal Party. Widely considered one of the 20th century's most significant figures, Churchill remains popular in the UK and Western world, where he is seen as a victorious wartime leader who played an important role in defending liberal democracy from the spread of fascism. Also praised as a social reformer and writer, among his many awards was the Nobel Prize in Literature. Conversely, his imperialist views and comments on race, as well as his sanctioning of human rights abuses in the suppression of anti-imperialist movements seeking independence from the British Empire, have generated considerable controversy., Size : 8vo,

Seller: Alexandre Antique Prints, Maps & Books, Toronto, ON, Canada

. An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill speaking at the 27 March 1941 Conservative and Unionist Associations Central Council Meeting in London. Evening Standard 27 March 1941, London, 1941.

Price: US$180.00 + shipping

Description: This original press photograph captures Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill delivering a speech at the 27 March 1941 Conservative and Unionist Associations Central Council Meeting in London. The gelatin silver print on heavy matte photo paper measures 9.5 x 11.5 in (24.2 x 29.2 cm). Condition is very good minus. The paper is clean, crisp, and free of scratches with some edge wear (most noticeable at the left and bottom edges), two short closed tears to the left edge and a crease to the bottom left corner. This press photo once belonged to the working archive of the Evening Standard and features original hand-applied retouching to the figures’ faces and clothes. The verso bears the copyright stamp of "The Evening Standard", a received stamp dated 27 MAR 1941, handwritten printing notations, and a clipping of the caption as it was published reading, "Mr. Churchill speaking at to-day’s Conservative meeting – Evening Standard exclusive picture." That Churchill became his Party’s leader was anything but inevitable and born far more of wartime exigency than confident mutual regard. It requires little imagination to read some skeptical reservation on the faces beside and behind Churchill captured in this image. Churchill warred with his own Conservative Party throughout the 1930s. By the time of then-Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s 1938 Munich concessions to Hitler, so vehement was Churchill’s dissent with his own Party leadership that Churchill had effectively become leader of the opposition. Nonetheless, on 10 May 1940 he became Prime Minister – not of a Conservative government, but of a wartime Coalition government. Churchill would not head a Conservative government until his second and final premiership of 1951-1955. In the meantime, the first year of Churchill’s wartime premiership for Britain was not so much a struggle for victory as a struggle to survive. His first year in office saw, among other near-calamities, the Battle of the Atlantic, the fall of France, evacuation at Dunkirk, and the Battle of Britain. Churchill could take nothing for granted, including the support of his own Conservative Party. Fortunately for Churchill, this Party Council meeting occurred just days after Churchill was able to announce a vital material lifeline for Britain in the form of American approval of the Lend-Lease Act. Moreover, "Britain’s air defences now "mitigated the full horror of earlier night attacks"". (Gilbert, Vol. VI, p.1035) And on the day this image was captured, 27 March 1941, "Churchill’s confidence was boosted by the completion in Washington of the United States-British Staff Conversations, which had culminated in ‘Joint Basic War Plan Number One’ of the United States and the British Commonwealth ‘for war against the Axis Powers’". (Gilbert, Vol. VI, p.1044) Photographs like this provide poignant, tangible evidence of Churchill’s formidable prowess as an orator – a skill used to great effect during the Second World War when Churchill "mobilized the English language and sent it into battle." (Edward R. Murrow) Here Churchill is captured making the case for his Party’s continued support in his coalition government. Churchill reminded his audience "The reason why His Majesty entrusted me in May last with the formation of a Government was because it was an almost universal opinion that national unity must be established in order to face the dangers by which we were encompassed." Churchill deftly salved wounds by praising Neville Chamberlain for "greatest assistance" and "perfect loyalty". Later in the speech Churchill reminded his Party both for the need for the present Government and his place at its head: "I said that the Government was formed in a dark hour and there was worse to come. But I cannot pretend to you, my friends and supporters, that I took up my task with any other feeling than that of invincible confidence. That is the feeling which inspires me here to-day." (Complete Speeches, Vol. VI, p. 6365)

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill and others. Addresses by Winston Churchill and Others at the Ninety-First Annual Commencement of the University of Rochester The first published appearance of Churchill's 16 June 1941 wartime broadcast address to the University of Rochester, his mother's birth city. University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, 1941.

Price: US$200.00 + shipping

Description: This scarce pamphlet is the first published appearance of Winston S. Churchill's speech of 16 June 1941, early in Churchill’s Second World War premiership and nearly half a year before the United States formally entered the war. The speech was broadcast from 10 Downing Street on the occasion of Churchill receiving an Honorary Degree of Laws from the New York State's University of Rochester. Churchill had assumed the Premiership just a year earlier on 10 May 1940. By 16 June 1941, Churchill had led his nation for a frightful, solitary year since the fall of France. Britain would continue to stand alone against Hitler's Germany until the United States formally entered the Second World War after the 7 December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Courting American empathy and support was of critical importance. In particular, severe merchant shipping losses to German U-Boats in April and May of 1941 were a spur "to press continually for a wider American contribution to Britain's war effort." (Gilbert, Vol. VI, p.111) Churchill's speeches conveyed the political determination of the British government and steadfastness of the British people to an American nation not yet fully engaged in the war. Given that Churchill’s mother was born in Rochester and Franklin Delano Roosevelt had served as Governor of New York State, this Broadcast address to a New York University, which might otherwise seem obscure, was a timely opportunity. In his speech Churchill spoke of "sense of kinship and of unity", and of his ancestral connection to Rochester. Nearly every sentence of Churchill's remarks limned common heritage, values, and purpose, all the while conveying British resolve to prevail: "For more than a year, we British have stood alone uplifted by your sympathy and respect, sustained by our own unconquerable will power and by the increasing growth and hopes of your massive aid. Whatever happens, we shall endure to the end." This speech was eventually published in His Complete Speeches as "The Old Lion". The title comes from the speech's penultimate paragraph: Now the old lion. stands alone against hunters who are armed with deadly weapons and impelled by desperate and destructive rage." The speech concludes striking the balance between Britain's resolve and urgent need: ".time is short. Every month that passes adds to the length and the perils of the journey that will have to be made. United we can save and guide the world." Clearly, the intended American audience was broader than Rochester. Four days later, on 20 June, Churchill telegraphed Roosevelt thanking him for establishment of trans-Atlantic "Ferry Service" using American Army pilots and American-manned staging posts with servicing facilities and assuring the President that "There will be no weakening here." The pamphlet measures 9.25 x 6 inches (23.5 x 15.25 cm), bound in wire-stitched, laid watermarked card wraps, both the front wrap and contents with untrimmed edges. The contents number 23 pages. Churchill's full address is printed at pages 7-9, preceded by his portrait photograph at page 6. The balance of the pamphlet contains a Foreword, the degree presentation by University President Alan Valentine, excerpts from an address by Eve Curie (daughter of Marie Curie), excerpts from an address by Robert P. Patterson (Roosevelt's Under Secretary of War), and a list of honorary degrees conferred in 1941. Condition is very good plus. The covers are complete and firmly attached, both binding staples rusted but tight. The covers show light soiling and spotting. This is an elusive item. This copy survived proximate to its source, coming to us courtesy of an upstate Upstate New York bookseller. Bibliographic reference: Cohen D80, Woods D(b)53/1.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrim Society, March 18, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$200.00 + shipping

Description: This leaflet is the first edition, only printing, of Churchill's 18 March 1941 address to the Pilgrims Society (erroneously printed as "Pilgrim Society" on the leaflet cover). Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Churchill addressed the Pilgrims Society on 18 March to welcome the new American Ambassador to the United Kingdom, John. G. Winant, in the wake of the passage of the Lend-Lease Act by the U.S. Congress. "We welcome you here, Mr. Winant, at a moment when the great battle in which your government and nation are deeply interested is developing its full scope and severity. Mr. Winant, you come to us at a grand turning point in the world's history." John "Gil" Gilbert Winant (1889-1947) was the 45th U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom. He succeeded the pro-appeasement Joseph Kennedy and marked a decidedly different, pro-Britain, pro-alliance perspective than his predecessor. Upon arriving in England on 2 March 1941, Winant announced "I'm very glad to be here. There is no place I'd rather be at this time than in England." Churchill would conclude his 18 March 1941 welcoming remarks to Winant "You, Mr. Ambassador, share our purpose. You'll share our dangers. You'll share our interests. You shall share our secrets. And the day will come when the British Empire and the United States will share together the solemn but splendid duties which are the crown of victory." Less than nine months after Churchill gave this speech, Winant was with Churchill when the latter learned of the attack on Pearl Harbor, precipitating formal U.S. entry into the war. Winant would serve as U.S. Ambassador until 1946. Winant reportedly had an affair with Churchill's daughter, Sarah. Both of Winant's sons served in WWII, John. Jr. as a B-17 pilot in the Eighth Air Force who became a prominent German prisoner of war. This first edition, only printing of Churchill's 18 March 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide. This is one of a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. Condition is very good. The paper is bright and crisp, though with a tiny bump to the lower front corner, a faint suggestion of creasing at the upper front corner, and a tiny stain at the extreme top edge as well as a small rust stain at the upper left side of the front cover where this leaflet apparently lay against another, staple-bound pamphlet, causing offsetting. This leaflet is protected in a removable, archival mylar sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A144, Woods A68.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

WINSTON CHURCHILL. WINSTON CHURCHILL'S WAR SPEECHES. CASSELL AND COMPANY LTD, 1941.

Price: US$200.00 + shipping

Condition: Good

Description: 1ST BRITISH EDITION

Seller: Mima Mia Books, BROOKLINE, MA, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston. SPEECH BY THE PRIME MINISTER MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL, April 27, 1941. The British Library of Information. 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, 1941.

Price: US$200.00 + shipping

Description: First edition. [8] pp. 1 vols. 8vo. Wooda A 70

Seller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA, New York, NY, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston. SPEECH BY THE PRIME MINISTER MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL, To the Pilgrims. January 9, 1941. The British Library of Information. 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, 1941.

Price: US$200.00 + shipping

Description: First edition. [8] pp. 1 vols. 8vo. Wooda A 65

Seller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA, New York, NY, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston. SPEECH BY THE PRIME MINISTER MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL To the Pilgrim Society. March 18, 1941. The British Library of Information. 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, 1941.

Price: US$200.00 + shipping

Description: First edition and sole printing. [4] pp. 1 vols. 8vo.

Seller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA, New York, NY, U.S.A.

CHURCHILL, Winston S.. War Speeches - the first six volumes]. Into Battle; The Unrelenting Struggle; The End of the Beginning; Onwards to Victory; The Dawn of Liberation; Victory. London, 1941.

Price: US$211.35 + shipping

Description: London, 1941 (the first volume, first edition) and Melbourne, 1942 to 1947 [Volumes 2-6, all first Australian editions]. Octavo; six volumes; cloth; occasional light flecks and bumps; top edge of Volume 5 foxed; Volume 2 lacks the leaf of (two) plates facing page 152; an excellent run with dustwrappers on all but the first volume (the last four a little chipped, the second one also a little marked and with minor loss to the front panel).

Seller: Michael Treloar Booksellers ANZAAB/ILAB, Adelaide, SA, Australia

Winston S. Churchill and others. Addresses by Winston Churchill and Others at the Ninety-First Annual Commencement of the University of Rochester The first published appearance of Churchill's 16 June 1941 wartime broadcast address to the University of Rochester, his mother's birth city. University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, 1941.

Price: US$220.00 + shipping

Description: This scarce pamphlet is the first published appearance of Winston S. Churchill's speech of 16 June 1941, early in Churchill’s Second World War premiership and nearly half a year before the United States formally entered the war. The speech was broadcast from 10 Downing Street on the occasion of Churchill receiving an Honorary Degree of Laws from the New York State's University of Rochester. Churchill had assumed the Premiership just a year earlier on 10 May 1940. By 16 June 1941, Churchill had led his nation for a frightful, solitary year since the fall of France. Britain would continue to stand alone against Hitler's Germany until the United States formally entered the Second World War after the 7 December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Courting American empathy and support was of critical importance. In particular, severe merchant shipping losses to German U-Boats in April and May of 1941 were a spur "to press continually for a wider American contribution to Britain's war effort." (Gilbert, Vol. VI, p.111) Churchill's speeches conveyed the political determination of the British government and steadfastness of the British people to an American nation not yet fully engaged in the war. Given that Churchill’s mother was born in Rochester and Franklin Delano Roosevelt had served as Governor of New York State, this Broadcast address to a New York University, which might otherwise seem obscure, was a timely opportunity. In his speech Churchill spoke of "sense of kinship and of unity", and of his ancestral connection to Rochester. Nearly every sentence of Churchill's remarks limned common heritage, values, and purpose, all the while conveying British resolve to prevail: "For more than a year, we British have stood alone uplifted by your sympathy and respect, sustained by our own unconquerable will power and by the increasing growth and hopes of your massive aid. Whatever happens, we shall endure to the end." This speech was eventually published in His Complete Speeches as "The Old Lion". The title comes from the speech's penultimate paragraph: Now the old lion. stands alone against hunters who are armed with deadly weapons and impelled by desperate and destructive rage." The speech concludes striking the balance between Britain's resolve and urgent need: ".time is short. Every month that passes adds to the length and the perils of the journey that will have to be made. United we can save and guide the world." Clearly, the intended American audience was broader than Rochester. Four days later, on 20 June, Churchill telegraphed Roosevelt thanking him for establishment of trans-Atlantic "Ferry Service" using American Army pilots and American-manned staging posts with servicing facilities and assuring the President that "There will be no weakening here." The pamphlet measures 9.25 x 6 inches (23.5 x 15.25 cm), bound in wire-stitched, laid watermarked card wraps, both the front wrap and contents with untrimmed edges. The contents number 23 pages. Churchill's full address is printed at pages 7-9, preceded by his portrait photograph at page 6. The balance of the pamphlet contains a Foreword, the degree presentation by University President Alan Valentine, excerpts from an address by Eve Curie (daughter of Marie Curie), excerpts from an address by Robert P. Patterson (Roosevelt's Under Secretary of War), and a list of honorary degrees conferred in 1941. Condition is near fine. The covers are complete and firmly attached, both binding staples intact and free of corrosion. The covers are remarkably clean apart from minor wrinkling to the bottom edge and a trivial hint of staining to the lower rear cover. The contents are pristine. This is an elusive item. Bibliographic reference: Cohen D80, Woods D(b)53/1.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston S.. Speech Broadcast by The Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill, April 27, 1941. New York: The British Library of Information, 1941.

Price: US$250.00 + shipping

Description: 8pp. A fine, unmarked copy in wrappers.

Seller: Carpe Librum, Williamstown, MA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrims, January 9, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$250.00 + shipping

Description: This is the first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech to the Pilgrims Society (referred to as "the Pilgrims" in the title on the cover) welcoming Lord Halifax as British Ambassador to the United States. Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax (1881-1959) became British Ambassador to the United States after the sudden death of Lord Lothian in December 1940. Halifax, then the Foreign Secretary, was appointed only after both Lloyd George and Oliver Lyttelton had been considered, and is an example of the many personalities and considerations Churchill balanced in his wartime coalition government. In choosing the architect of Chamberlain's appeasement policy as ambassador to the one nation Britain most desperately needed to join the war, Churchill is reported as reasoning that Halifax "would never live down his reputation for appeasement which he and the Foreign Office had won themselves" and that "He had no future in this country. On the other hand he had a glorious opportunity in America, for, unless the United States came into the war, we could not win, or at least we could not win a really satisfactory peace." (Gilbert, Volume VI, pages 952-953) Halifax reluctantly accepted the appointment, allowing the return of Anthony Eden to the Foreign Secretary post, which he had resigned in 1938 in opposition to Chamberlain's appeasement policy. Halifax served as Ambassador to the U.S. until May 1946. In this address to the Pilgrims Society, Churchill calls Halifax "a man of light and learning" and, perhaps anticipating the effect of his new ambassador's pro-appeasement history, Churchill says: "I have often disagreed with him in the twenty years I have known him, but I have always respected him and his actions because I know that courage and fidelity are the essence of his being." Of the critical relationship between Britain and America, Churchill states: "The identity of purpose and persistence of resolve prevailing throughout the English-speaking world will, more than any other single fact, determine the way of life which will be open to generations, and perhaps to centuries, which follow our own." This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. As do most in the series, this example bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a royal arms device at the top right. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) This first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide and printed on the first three pages. This example is in near-fine condition. The leaflet is complete with virtually no wear. We note slight age-toning to the perimeter and a hint of spotting along the lower left edge of the front cover and two small spots on the rear cover. Protected in a removable, archival mylar sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A139, Woods A65

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrim Society, March 18, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$250.00 + shipping

Description: This leaflet is the first edition, only printing, of Churchill's 18 March 1941 address to the Pilgrims Society (erroneously printed as "Pilgrim Society" on the leaflet cover). Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Churchill addressed the Pilgrims Society on 18 March to welcome the new American Ambassador to the United Kingdom, John. G. Winant, in the wake of the passage of the Lend-Lease Act by the U.S. Congress. "We welcome you here, Mr. Winant, at a moment when the great battle in which your government and nation are deeply interested is developing its full scope and severity. Mr. Winant, you come to us at a grand turning point in the world's history." John "Gil" Gilbert Winant (1889-1947) was the 45th U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom. He succeeded the pro-appeasement Joseph Kennedy and marked a decidedly different, pro-Britain, pro-alliance perspective than his predecessor. Upon arriving in England on 2 March 1941, Winant announced "I'm very glad to be here. There is no place I'd rather be at this time than in England." Churchill would conclude his 18 March 1941 welcoming remarks to Winant "You, Mr. Ambassador, share our purpose. You'll share our dangers. You'll share our interests. You shall share our secrets. And the day will come when the British Empire and the United States will share together the solemn but splendid duties which are the crown of victory." Less than nine months after Churchill gave this speech, Winant was with Churchill when the latter learned of the attack on Pearl Harbor, precipitating formal U.S. entry into the war. Winant would serve as U.S. Ambassador until 1946. Winant reportedly had an affair with Churchill's daughter, Sarah. Both of Winant's sons served in WWII, John. Jr. as a B-17 pilot in the Eighth Air Force who became a prominent German prisoner of war. This first edition, only printing of Chuchill's 18 March 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide. This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. Condition is near-fine. The paper is bright with virtually no wear. We note only a hint of soiling along the left and bottom edges and a small rust stain at the lower left front cover where it apparently lay against another pamphlet, causing light offsetting. A collector-worthy copy of a speech from a critical time. Protected in a removable, archival mylar sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A144, Woods A68

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrims, January 9, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$250.00 + shipping

Description: This item is from the personal collection of Churchill's bibliographer, Ronald I. Cohen. This is the first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech to the Pilgrims Society (referred to as "the Pilgrims" in the title on the cover) welcoming Lord Halifax as British Ambassador to the United States. Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax (1881-1959) became British Ambassador to the United States after the sudden death of Lord Lothian in December 1940. Halifax, then the Foreign Secretary, was appointed only after both Lloyd George and Oliver Lyttelton had been considered, and is an example of the many personalities and considerations Churchill balanced in his wartime coalition government. In choosing the architect of Chamberlain's appeasement policy as ambassador to the one nation Britain most desperately needed to join the war, Churchill is reported as reasoning that Halifax "would never live down his reputation for appeasement which he and the Foreign Office had won themselves" and that "He had no future in this country. On the other hand he had a glorious opportunity in America, for, unless the United States came into the war, we could not win, or at least we could not win a really satisfactory peace." (Gilbert, Volume VI, pages 952-953) Halifax reluctantly accepted the appointment, allowing the return of Anthony Eden to the Foreign Secretary post, which he had resigned in 1938 in opposition to Chamberlain's appeasement policy. Halifax served as Ambassador to the U.S. until May 1946. In this address to the Pilgrims Society, Churchill calls Halifax "a man of light and learning" and, perhaps anticipating the effect of his new ambassador's pro-appeasement history, Churchill says: "I have often disagreed with him in the twenty years I have known him, but I have always respected him and his actions because I know that courage and fidelity are the essence of his being." Of the critical relationship between Britain and America, Churchill states: "The identity of purpose and persistence of resolve prevailing throughout the English-speaking world will, more than any other single fact, determine the way of life which will be open to generations, and perhaps to centuries, which follow our own." This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. As do most in the series, this example bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a royal arms device at the top right. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) This first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide and printed on the first three pages. This example is in near fine plus condition. The paper is crisp, bright, and clean with no soiling, spotting, or previous ownership marks. We note only a barely discernible hint of wrinkling to the top edge. The leaflet is protected in a removable, clear plastic sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A139, Woods A65

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrim Society, March 18, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$275.00 + shipping

Description: This leaflet is the first edition, only printing, of Churchill's 18 March 1941 address to the Pilgrims Society (erroneously printed as "Pilgrim Society" on the leaflet cover). Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Churchill addressed the Pilgrims Society on 18 March to welcome the new American Ambassador to the United Kingdom, John. G. Winant, in the wake of the passage of the Lend-Lease Act by the U.S. Congress. "We welcome you here, Mr. Winant, at a moment when the great battle in which your government and nation are deeply interested is developing its full scope and severity. Mr. Winant, you come to us at a grand turning point in the world's history." John "Gil" Gilbert Winant (1889-1947) was the 45th U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom. He succeeded the pro-appeasement Joseph Kennedy and marked a decidedly different, pro-Britain, pro-alliance perspective than his predecessor. Upon arriving in England on 2 March 1941, Winant announced "I'm very glad to be here. There is no place I'd rather be at this time than in England." Churchill would conclude his 18 March 1941 welcoming remarks to Winant "You, Mr. Ambassador, share our purpose. You'll share our dangers. You'll share our interests. You shall share our secrets. And the day will come when the British Empire and the United States will share together the solemn but splendid duties which are the crown of victory." Less than nine months after Churchill gave this speech, Winant was with Churchill when the latter learned of the attack on Pearl Harbor, precipitating formal U.S. entry into the war. Winant would serve as U.S. Ambassador until 1946. Winant reportedly had an affair with Churchill's daughter, Sarah. Both of Winant's sons served in WWII, John. Jr. as a B-17 pilot in the Eighth Air Force who became a prominent German prisoner of war. This first edition, only printing of Chuchill's 18 March 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide. This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. Condition is near-fine plus. The paper is bright, crisp, and clean with no wear or spotting. We note only barely discernible creasing and minor rust stains to the rear along the spine where this unstapled leaflet apparently lay against another pamphlet, causing light offsetting. A superior copy of a speech from a critical time. Protected in a removable, clear sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A144, Woods A68

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrim Society, March 18, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$295.00 + shipping

Description: This leaflet is the first edition, only printing, of Churchill's 18 March 1941 address to the Pilgrims Society (erroneously printed as "Pilgrim Society" on the leaflet cover). Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Churchill addressed the Pilgrims Society on 18 March to welcome the new American Ambassador to the United Kingdom, John. G. Winant, in the wake of the passage of the Lend-Lease Act by the U.S. Congress. "We welcome you here, Mr. Winant, at a moment when the great battle in which your government and nation are deeply interested is developing its full scope and severity. Mr. Winant, you come to us at a grand turning point in the world's history." John "Gil" Gilbert Winant (1889-1947) was the 45th U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom. He succeeded the pro-appeasement Joseph Kennedy and marked a decidedly different, pro-Britain, pro-alliance perspective than his predecessor. Upon arriving in England on 2 March 1941, Winant announced "I'm very glad to be here. There is no place I'd rather be at this time than in England." Churchill would conclude his 18 March 1941 welcoming remarks to Winant "You, Mr. Ambassador, share our purpose. You'll share our dangers. You'll share our interests. You shall share our secrets. And the day will come when the British Empire and the United States will share together the solemn but splendid duties which are the crown of victory." Less than nine months after Churchill gave this speech, Winant was with Churchill when the latter learned of the attack on Pearl Harbor, precipitating formal U.S. entry into the war. Winant would serve as U.S. Ambassador until 1946. Winant reportedly had an affair with Churchill's daughter, Sarah. Both of Winant's sons served in WWII, John. Jr. as a B-17 pilot in the Eighth Air Force who became a prominent German prisoner of war. This first edition, only printing of Chuchill's 18 March 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide. This is one of a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. Condition is fine. The paper is bright, crisp, and clean with no wear, spotting, or previous ownership marks. A superior copy of a speech from a critical time. Protected in a removable, archival quality clear sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A144, Woods A68

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston. Broadcast Addresses to the People of Great Britain, Italy, Poland, Russia, and the United States, by the Prime Minister of the British Empire, Winston Churchill, MCMXL-MCMXLI. Ransohoffs [Printed by the Grabhorn Press], San Francisco, 1941.

Price: US$300.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: One of 250 copies, elephant folio size, 62 pp. In addition to having been a highly-regarded (albeit somewhat controversial) Prime Minister of England and one who can justly claim a large part of the credit for helping the Allies win World War II, Winston Churchill (1874-1965) is also widely considered to have been one of the greatest speakers of the twentieth century. Among his most famous speeches were those in 1940 when Churchill rallied the British nation with his words and optimism, a portion of which are presented in this volume. A prolific writer as well as a gifted speaker, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for his overall body of work in 1953 (n. b. info from The National Churchill Museum website). ___DESCRIPTION: Quarter natural linen with blue cloth boards, tan paper spine label with gilt lettering, coat-of-arms of the United Kingdom in blue and gold preceding the title page, quotation in blue and black following the title page ("Sail On, O Ship of State!" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow), initials, marginal titles and printer's device all in blue; hand-set Goudy Modern type, handmade French paper, elephant folio size (16" by 10.75"), pagination: [i-iii] [1] 2-57 [58] [1 colophon], one of 250 copies, unnumbered. ___CONDITION: Volume is very good, with straight corners, a strong, square text block with solid hinges, the interior is bright and clean, entirely free of prior owner markings; boards are clean overall with some slight soiling to the linen spine, spine label lightly sunned, age-toning to the front free endpaper, and the first six pages have a shallow crease about halfway down the page (affecting the coat-of-arms and title pages only). ___CITATION: Grabhorn Press Bibliography no. 361. ___POSTAGE: Please note that this is a large and heavy volume and additional postage may apply; please contact us for details. ___Swan's Fine Books is pleased to be a member of the ABAA, ILAB, and IOBA and we stand behind every book we sell. Please contact us with any questions you may have, we are here to help.

Seller: Swan's Fine Books, ABAA, ILAB, IOBA, Walnut Creek, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Speech by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill to the Pilgrims, January 9, 1941. The British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$300.00 + shipping

Description: This is the first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech to the Pilgrims Society (referred to as "the Pilgrims" in the title on the cover) welcoming Lord Halifax as British Ambassador to the United States. Founded in 1902, the Pilgrims Society is an Anglo-American organization whose objective is "the encouragement of Anglo-American good fellowship". Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax (1881-1959) became British Ambassador to the United States after the sudden death of Lord Lothian in December 1940. Halifax, then the Foreign Secretary, was appointed only after both Lloyd George and Oliver Lyttelton had been considered, and is an example of the many personalities and considerations Churchill balanced in his wartime coalition government. In choosing the architect of Chamberlain's appeasement policy as ambassador to the one nation Britain most desperately needed to join the war, Churchill is reported as reasoning that Halifax "would never live down his reputation for appeasement which he and the Foreign Office had won themselves" and that "He had no future in this country. On the other hand he had a glorious opportunity in America, for, unless the United States came into the war, we could not win, or at least we could not win a really satisfactory peace." (Gilbert, Volume VI, pages 952-953) Halifax reluctantly accepted the appointment, allowing the return of Anthony Eden to the Foreign Secretary post, which he had resigned in 1938 in opposition to Chamberlain's appeasement policy. Halifax served as Ambassador to the U.S. until May 1946. In this address to the Pilgrims Society, Churchill calls Halifax "a man of light and learning" and, perhaps anticipating the effect of his new ambassador's pro-appeasement history, Churchill says: "I have often disagreed with him in the twenty years I have known him, but I have always respected him and his actions because I know that courage and fidelity are the essence of his being." Of the critical relationship between Britain and America, Churchill states: "The identity of purpose and persistence of resolve prevailing throughout the English-speaking world will, more than any other single fact, determine the way of life which will be open to generations, and perhaps to centuries, which follow our own." This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York. As do most in the series, this example bears a cover design featuring 3 vertical rules along the right side and a royal arms device at the top right. The British Library of Information published twenty-nine editions of statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) This first edition, only printing of Churchill's January 9, 1941 speech is a four-page folded paper leaflet measuring 9 inches tall x 6 inches wide and printed on the first three pages. This example is in fine condition - crisp, clean, and bright with no wear. The only trivial flaw is a .25 inch rust stain offset from where we presume this leaflet once rested against a sister pamphlet with a lightly rusted binding staple. Despite this trivial flaw, a lovely copy. The paper is crisp, bright, and clean with no wear or soiling. Protected in a removable, archival mylar sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A139, Woods A65

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Address by the Prime Minister Mr. Winston Churchill, December 2, 1941 Churchill's address to Parliament five days before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor extending compulsory British National service to unmarried and childless women and both older and younger men. British Library of Information, New York, 1941.

Price: US$350.00 + shipping

Description: This is the first edition, only printing of Prime Minister Winston Churchill's speech to Parliament of December 2, 1941, calling on Britain to extend the obligation for National Service to all unmarried women and all childless widows between the ages of 20 and 30, as well as men up to the age of 60, and lowering the age of compulsory male military service to 18 ½. A precipitating cause was apparently insufficient men volunteering for police and civilian defence work, or women for the auxiliary units of the armed forces, as well as the projection of bringing in a younger "additional 70,000 recruits to the armed forces during the year 1942". Churchill’s speech was made just five days before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that brought the U.S. formally into the Second World War. The speech and timing eloquently dramatize the plight of beleaguered Britain, still without the full U.S. military alliance and fighting support. Churchill opens his speech thus: "We have to call upon the nation for a further degree of sacrifice and exertion." He strikes a delicate balance, reassuring the country of positive developments and hopeful horizons, but also stressing the ongoing perils and interim deficiencies that compel the necessity. There is a sharp reminder of purpose: "We have been hitherto at a disadvantage in the future the Hun will feel all the sharpness of the weapons with which he has subjugated an unprepared, disorganized Europe " There is Churchillian recognition and ennobling of sacrifice: "A heavy burden will fall upon us in 1942 These demands will intimately affect the lives of many men and women There will also be a further very definite curtailment of the amenities we have hitherto been able to preserve. These demands will not affect that contentment of spirit that comes from serving great causes ." There is also Churchillian attention to detail. Churchill specifically explicitly states his task is " seeing the picture as a whole". Nonetheless, Churchill then speaks in statistical and narrative detail about the changes in social and operational roles expected for men, women, and youth. The role of women is of particular note, both for the social implications and as an indicator of Britain’s exigencies. Churchill states that "Over 170,000 women are needed for the A.T.S. and of these over 100,000 are required for the Air Defence forces." This pamphlet is one in a series of Churchill's speeches printed by the British Library of Information in New York, which published twenty-nine editions of Churchill’s statements, speeches, and broadcast addresses, beginning with his first speech as Prime Minister of May 13, 1940 and ending with the broadcast address of November 29, 1942. These editions were often issued within two or three days of delivery and "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the Prime Minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war. Indeed, twenty-two of the BLOI speech pamphlets were published before Pearl Harbor." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513, A120) As do most in the series, this edition bears a cover design featuring three vertical rules along the right side and a coat of arms at the top right. The eight-page, wire-stitched pamphlet in self-wraps measures nine by six inches. Condition is very good. The pamphlet is crisp and complete with only trivial soiling and perimeter toning. Both binding staples are firmly intact with minimal corrosion. What leads us to grade this pamphlet as "very good" rather than near-fine may be intriguing – numerical notation and calculation on the blank lower rear cover dated "2/11. 43". The calculation seems plausibly population calculations by a wartime reader based on the numerous figures given by Churchill in the speech, but this is only speculation. The pamphlet is protected in a removable, clear plastic sleeve. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A160, Woods A81

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

. An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill signing the Lend Lease agreement on 11 March 1941 beside U.S. Ambassador to Britain Gil Winant. Copyright by Wide World Photos, published by The Daily Telegraph 28 March 1941, London, 1941.

Price: US$350.00 + shipping

Description: This wartime press photograph captures a pivotal moment in the struggle between then Prime Minister Winston Churchill’s Britain and Hitler’s Germany, the 11 March 1941 official signing of the Lend-Lease agreement that committed a still-officially neutral America to enabling Britain’s survival. The gelatin silver print on matte photo paper measures 9.5 x 7.5 inches (24.1 x 19.1 cm). Condition is good, the surface clean and bright, though with some wear, creasing, and fractional loss to extremities, as well as a one inch (2.54 cm) closed tear at the left edge. Light scratches are visible only under raking light. The photograph belonged to The Daily Telegraph’s working archive and features their Art Department’s hand-applied retouching to the folds of Winant’s and Churchill’s suits, as well as Churchill’s facial features, fingers, and fingernails, as well as crop lines at the left and lower edges. The verso features the copyright ink stamp of Wide World Photos, the 28 March 1941 dated publication stamp of The Daily Telegraph Art Department, hand pencil notations, and the original newspaper caption. The caption reads: "With Mr. J. G. Winant, the American Ambassador, looking on, Mr. Winston Churchill signs the agreement by which Britain leases Atlantic bases to the United States. On the left is Mr. Charles Fahy, who was a signatory, like Mr. Winant himself, on behalf of America." This photograph is housed in a removable, archival mylar sleeve within a rigid, crimson cloth folder. The caption understates the scope and significance of the signatures. The rights to British bases, which Churchill had negotiated with Winant, was part of the Lend-Lease Agreement. Before passage of the Lend-Lease Bill, Churchill had told Ambassador Winant that without the Lend-Lease Act "we should be unable to carry on and win the war". (Roberts, Walking with Destiny, p.639) The Lend-Lease Act authorized President Roosevelt to transfer arms or any other defense materials for which Congress appropriated money to "the government of any country whose defense the President deems vital to the defense of the United States." Soon after enacting Lend-Lease, the U.S. also extended its naval security zone several thousand miles into the Atlantic, effectively shielding much of the Atlantic convoy route. Lend-Lease material support allowed Britain to fight on. In accordance with the vital importance of the deal to Britain’s survival, Churchill gave hyperbolic praise. In a 12 November 1941 speech to the House of Commons he said: "The Lend and Lease Bill must be regarded without question as the most unsordid act in the whole of recorded history." Like Lend-Lease, the new U.S. ambassador, John G. "Gil" Gilbert Winant (1889-1947), symbolized FDR’s commitment to Britain. Winant – "Charming and handsome" and just fifty-one when he became ambassador - succeeded the pro-appeasement Joseph Kennedy and brought a decidedly different, pro-Britain, pro-alliance perspective. Winant served as U.S. Ambassador until 1946, working closely with Churchill during his wartime premiership. Winant was with Churchill when the latter learned of the attack on Pearl Harbor. He was with Churchill for FDR’s memorial service at St. Paul’s Cathedral in April 1944, escorting a sobbing Churchill. And he was with the Churchills in other ways as well; Winant allegedly had a wartime affair with Churchill’s daughter, Sarah. He died by his own hand in 1947. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism fundamentally changed the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies photographs, their versos typically marked with ink stamps, provenance notes, and captions. Art departments often took brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. While England Slept. G.P. Putnam’s Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$400.00 + shipping

Condition: Very Good

Description: This book is the precursor to Churchill's great war speeches. The British edition was given the politically palatable title "Arms and the Covenant". The U.S. title is a bit more honest. The book contains a collection of speeches spanning the years 1928 to 1938 criticizing British foreign policy and warning prophetically of the coming danger. The world remembers the resolute war leader to whom the British entrusted their fate, but it is easy to forget the years leading up to the war which Churchill spent persistent, eloquent, and largely unheeded. Churchill bibliographer Frederick Woods called this edition "probably the most crucial volume of speeches that he ever published". As testimony to the book's importance, a copy of While England Slept lay on "President Roosevelt's bedside table, with key passages, including an analysis of the president's peace initiative, underscored." (William Manchester's The Last Lion, Volume II, p.305). This is a bibliographically interesting copy - the orange cloth binding variant of the first U.S. edition, fourth and final printing. The fourth printing was issued in 1941 (despite the 1938 date on the title and copyright pages). Even though this final printing was only 1,000 copies, two different variants of both the dust jacket and the binding are known. The fourth printing bindings were issued in both a smooth blue cloth identical to the first, second, and third printings and a strikingly different coarse orange cloth unique to the fourth and final printing. Fourth printings came in two dust jackets - one identical to that of the third printing and another with changes to the rear face and rear flap. Here is the rare orange cloth binding variant of the first edition, fourth and final printing in its original third-printing style dust jacket. This copy is in very good plus condition, the dust jacket in very good condition. The orange cloth binding is square, tight, and unfaded with just a few minor scuffs and trivial corner wear. The contents are bright and clean with no spotting and no previous ownership marks. Faint transfer browning corresponding to the dust jacket flaps confirms that this copy has spent its life with this dust jacket. The top edge retains uniform, strong red color. The fore and bottom edges show mild soiling and age-toning. The dust jacket is unclipped, still bearing the original $4.00 front flap price. Modest wear is confined to extremities, with shallow, 1/8 inch losses at the spine ends and three vertical scratches to the front face. The spine is only mildly sunned, retaining strong red color. The dust jacket is protected in a removable, archival quality clear cover. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A107.2.d, Woods/ICS A44(b.4). Langworth p.193.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. The War Speeches, a full set of seven British first editions - Into Battle, The Unrelenting Struggle, The End of the Beginning, Onwards to Victory, The Dawn of Liberation, Victory, and Secret Session Speeches. Cassell and Company Ltd., London, 1941.

Price: US$475.00 + shipping

Description: Here is a full set of British first edition, first printings of Churchill's seven war speeches volumes. Few books are as emblematic of Churchill’s literary and leadership gifts as his war speeches volumes. During his long public life, Winston Churchill played many roles worthy of note - Member of Parliament for more than half a century, soldier and war correspondent, author of scores of books, ardent social reformer, combative cold warrior, Nobel Prize winner, painter. But Churchill's preeminence as a historical figure owes most to his indispensable leadership during the Second World War, when his soaring and defiant oratory sustained his countrymen and inspired the free world. Of Churchill, Edward R. Murrow said: "He mobilized the English language and sent it into battle." When Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953, it was partly " for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values." Between 1941 and 1946, Churchill's war speeches were published in seven individual volumes. The British first editions are visually striking, but were printed on cheap "War Economy Standard" paper, bound in coarse cloth, and wrapped in bright, fragile dust jackets. They proved highly susceptible to spotting, soiling, and fading, so the passage of time has been hard on most surviving first editions. This full first edition, first printing set features good to very good volumes. The first volume, Into Battle, is not only first edition, but first state, denoted by the absence of pagination at pages 78 and 294, and is bound in the smoother, darker blue cloth we correlate to the first state. Victory is first state denoted by incorrect pagination at page 177. The blue cloth bindings remain square and tight, with light wear to extremities, toning of the Into Battle spine, and some white scuffing to the front cover fore edge of The End of the Beginning. The contents are respectably bright and clean, with moderate spotting primarily confined to the prelims and page edges. The only previous ownership marks are the same previous owner name and "Christmas 1942" notation inked on the front pastedown of the first two volumes. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A142.1.a, A172.1.b, A183.1.a, A194.1.a, A214.1.a, A223.1.a, A227.2.a; Woods/ICS A66(a.1), A89(a.1), A94(a.1), A101(a.1), A107(a.1), A112(ab), A114(b); Langworth pages 204, 213, 218, 223, 228, 234, 250.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston. Broadcast Addresses To The People Of Great Britain, Italy, Poland, Russia And The United States, By The Prime Minister Of The British Empire, Winston Churchill Mcmxl- Mcmxli. Ransohoffs / Grabhorn Press, San Francisco, 1941.

Price: US$700.00 + shipping

Condition: Fine

Description: First Printing In Book Form Of The Prime Minister's Famous War Speeches. One Of 250 Copies Printed By The Grabhorns (For Ransohoffs, San Francisco). White Linen Spine With Gilt Leather Spine Label, And Blue Cloth Boards. Finely Printed By The Grabhorns On Fine Paper With Deckled Edges. 16" X 10 3/4". A Fine Copy, No Wear Or Foxing Or Stains, Spine Label Complete And With Brilliant Gilt. Traces Of Rubbing Right Along Top And Bottom Edges Of Boards. Clear Dj Is 3/16" Taller Than Book, No Wear Or Tears Or Chips.

Seller: Arroyo Seco Books, Pasadena, Member IOBA, Pasadena, CA, U.S.A.

Winston S. Churchill. Blood Sweat and Tears, finely bound by Sangorski & Sutcliffe. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1941.

Price: US$775.00 + shipping

Description: This is a finely bound U.S. first edition of the first volume of Churchill's famous war speeches, containing speeches spanning May 1938, as pre-war tensions were cresting and appeasement was ascendant, with Churchill still out of power and out of favor, to February 1941, just a few months before Churchill became wartime Prime Minister. This copy is finely bound by Sangorski & Sutcliffe of London. The binding is half-blue morocco, evoking the publisher’s original blue cloth, over marbled paper-covered boards. Binding features include raised and gilt-tooled spine bands, extensively gilt decorated compartments, gilt rule transitions, generous leather corners, blue and gold head and foot bands, marbled endpapers matching the marbled paper boards, and gilt top edge. Condition of the binding is very good, square, tight, and clean with sharp corners. Trivial shelf wear and light, uniform spine toning does not appreciably detract from the exceptional binding. The contents are suited to the binding, clean with no spotting, no previous ownership marks, and modest toning to the otherwise clean fore and bottom edges. "BOUND BY SANGORSKI & SUTCLIFFE, LONDON" is stamped on the upper front free endpaper verso. This venerable firm, founded by Francis Sangorski and George Sutcliffe in 1901, became recognized as one of the leading bookbinders in London. Like Churchill himself, Sangorski & Sutcliffe endured the First World War, the Great Depression, the Second World War, and post-war austerity. Published in England as Into Battle, Blood, Sweat, and Tears this is one of the few Churchill first editions for which the U.S. edition bears a different title than the British. During his long public life, Winston Churchill played many roles worthy of note - member of Parliament for more than half a century, soldier and war correspondent, author of scores of books, ardent social reformer, combative cold warrior, Nobel Prize winner, painter. But Churchill's preeminence as a historical figure owes most to his indispensable leadership during the Second World War, when his soaring and defiant oratory sustained his countrymen and inspired the free world. Of Churchill, Edward R. Murrow said: "He mobilized the English language and sent it into battle." When Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953, it was partly " for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values." Between 1941 and 1946, Churchill's war speeches were published in seven individual volumes. In this first volume the great battle of the Twentieth Century and Churchill's life begins. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A142.3.a, Woods/ICS A66(b.1), Langworth p.207.

Seller: Churchill Book Collector ABAA/ILAB/IOBA, San Diego, CA, U.S.A.

Churchill, Winston. Broadcast Addresses to the People of Great Britain. 1940-1941.. , 1941.

Price: US$775.00 + shipping

Description: CHURCHILL, Winston S. Broadcast Addresses to the People of Great Britain, Italy, Poland, Russia and the United States. [6], 57, [2] pp., arms of Great Britain on half-title. Folio, 404 x 274 mm, bound in recent half morocco. San Francisco: Printed for Ransohoffs by the Grabhorn Press, 1941. This Fine Grabhorn Press Edition prints six important speeches of Winston Churchill delivered at the onset of World War II. The dates of the broadcasts range from December 23, 1940 to June 22, 1941, and thereby represent crucial communications from England to the Italian peoples, the British Nation and Empire, a broadcast to Polish peoples around the world, two general reports on the War, and a report on the Atlantic Meeting. Limited to 250 copies, printed in blue and black on hand-made paper. With large six-line initials in gold and blue and the blue and gold crest of England on the half-title. Being printed by the Grabhorn's within months of the final broadcast, this publication has to be one of the earliest to appear either in this country or England, and it is certainly the most elegantly printed of any subsequent edition. Woods D(a)8, containing Addresses A63, A67, A70, A71, A74, A76 (c).

Seller: Ursus Rare Books, New York, NY, U.S.A.

CHURCHILL, Winston S.. BROADCAST ADDRESSES TO THE PEOPLE OF GREAT BRITAIN, ITALY, POLAND, RUSSIA AND THE UNITED STATES, By The Prime Minister Of The British Empire, Winston Churchill.. San Francisco: The Grabhorn Press for Ransohoffs., 1941.

Price: US$17253.97 + shipping

Description: First edition. Limited to 250 copies. Inscribed by Winston Churchill. Large 4to. Publisher's original blue cloth boards with linen spine, titles in gilt to the a leather label on the spine. Printed at The Grabhorn Press on handmade paper in three colours. A very good copy, the binding square and firm with some rubbing and toning to the board edges and spotting to the linen spine. The contents with the small armorial Limur family bookplate to the front pastedown and a few minor spots to the margins are otherwise clean throughout. Inscribed in black ink on the front endpaper "Inscribed by Winston S. Churchill / January 1942". On December 22nd 1941, two weeks after Pearl Harbor, Winston Churchill arrived in Washington for a three week stay at the White House, where he celebrated Christmas with the Roosevelts. He turned the second floor Rose Suite into a temporary headquarters for the British government, messengers carrying documents to and from the embassy in red leather cases. On the 26th, shortly after midday Churchill stood before a microphone-laden Senate rostrum to address a joint meeting of Congress for the first time, later that evening suffering a mild [at that point undiagnosed] heart attack. During his time at the White House, the President and Prime Minister ate lunch together every day and bonded over the many late night brandy and cigar fuelled strategy sessions (much to the frustration of the First Lady), cementing the partnership that won World War II. This volume, collecting six of Churchill's speeches from 1940-1941, of which at least three are the first appearance in book form, was inscribed during Churchill's historic wartime visit for the Washington based French diplomat [Count] André de Limur (1890-1971). Limur served in the French armed forces in World War I, first as a cavalry officer and then as a pilot, winning the Croix de Guerre. In 1918 he married Ethel Crocker of San Francisco, California, and joined the French diplomatic corps holding posts in Madrid, London, and Washington. When France fell in World War II, de Limur resigned from the French Embassy in Washington, became an American citizen and joined the United States Army, landing on D-Day in France with Army Intelligence. As General George S. Patton's liaison with Free French forces, he accompanied General Jacques Philippe LeClerc at the liberation of Paris. A rare volume in signed state, indeed auction records (Rare Book Hub and ABPC) trace only one in the last 70 years (signed by Churchill in 1950, rebound in later boards; sold at PBA Galleries, San Francisco 2001). Further details and images for any of the items listed are available on request. Lucius Books welcomes direct contact with our customers.

Seller: LUCIUS BOOKS (ABA, ILAB, PBFA), York, United Kingdom