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Annotated Reference Guide to Collectible Books

Stoker Dracula

At 120 years old, a first-edition copy of Dracula would be an antique by any definition of the word, but its long-lasting impact on the horror genre has made it a classic and highly-sought collectible. Bram Stoker's 1897 novel did not find great acclaim during his lifetime, and did not find success until the well-known movies based on the novel came out beginning in 1931, well after Stoker's death. Because of this, copies of Dracula signed by the author are rare and in high demand, making it a fantastic investment piece and a trophy for any book collector.

The very first edition of Bram Stoker's Dracula was printing in the UK in 1897, and is recognizable by the yellow cloth binding and red title lettering. These generally sell for $5,000 or more, even without a signature, with a signed copy fetching tens of thousands of dollars. Some of the most valuable copies are those inscribed by Stoker to people he knew -- a copy addressed to his brother sold at auction for over $33,000.

The first edition of this book printed in America is also somewhat valuable, though nowhere near as much as the original British edition. This edition has a brown cloth cover with blue type.

Some later editions of Dracula can also be somewhat valuable, as well as much more affordable to the hobby collector, with some copies from the early 20th century selling for $100-$500.

Stoker, Bram. Dracula. Grosset and Dunlap: New York (1897).

Stoker, Bram. Dracula. Archibald Constable and Company: Westminster (1897). Signed U.K. Edition

Stoker, Bram. Dracula. Doubleday and McClure Company: New York (1899). First U.S. Edition

Stoker, Bram. Dracula. Archibald Constable and Company: Westminster (1901). First Abridged Edition

Stoker, Bram. Dracula. Rider: London (1912). 9th Edition

Stoker, Bram. Dracula. Grosset and Dunlap: New York (1927). Stage Play Edition

Stoker, Bram. Dracula. Grosset and Dunlap: New York (1931). Photoplay Edition

Stoker, Bram. Dracula. Modern Library: New York (1932). First Modern Edition

Stoker, Bram. Dracula's Guest. Hillman-Curl, Inc.: New York (1937). First U.S. Edition

Stoker, Bram. Dracula. Heritage Press: New York (1965). Illustrated by Felix Hoffmann; Introduction by Anthony Boucher

Stoker, Bram. Dracula. Limited Editions Club (1965). Signed Limited Edition; 1500 copies; Illustrated by Felix Hoffmann; Introduction by Anthony Boucher