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Annotated Reference Guide to Collectible Books

Lloyd Wright, Frank

Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright was one of America’s most revered architects, not merely for his sense of style and invention, but also for Wright’s ability throughout his career to adapt and change his vision; elevating the study of architecture and planning from a commodity of owner’s wants, to an art form. Early on in his career Lloyd Wright distinguished himself by his inventive use of Gothic and Victorian Revival.

Frank Lloyd Wright was one of America’s most revered architects, not merely for his sense of style and invention, but also for Wright’s ability throughout his career to adapt and change his vision; elevating the study of architecture and planning from a commodity of owner’s wants, to an art form. Early on in his career Lloyd Wright distinguished himself by his inventive use of Gothic and Victorian Revival.

A period of experimentation from the 1900’s right the way through to the early 1940’s saw him eradicate attics and basements, and instead rely upon vaguely Japanese extended ground floor designs, with living spaces separated by dividers or with transparent walls. Houses ‘flowed’ down the contours of their surroundings, but in a way that was still blocky, stiff even – as can be seen in the Guggenheim of New York City or Fallingwater house that imitates a water mill in Pennsylvania.

For the collector, Frank Lloyd Wright leaves a wonderful legacy of works, from treatises, essays, and full texts discussing the nature of the city, the building, the house, and urban planning. Thanks to his highly-esteemed nature, they can be very sought after if in the right condition. A pleasing item to collect would perhaps be The Disappearing City, Frank Lloyd Wright’s treatise on his vision for the future: an agrarian society with people living in singular mansion-like house networks. A good first edition of this work (William Farquhar Parson, 1932) could be found for as little as $450, whilst a signed true first edition of the same would be worth as much as $1000 with a good dustjacket still in place.

For the serious collector however, we would have to look at Wright’s work with Horizon Press towards the end of his life. The very attractive edition of The Living City (Horizon press, 1958) is a direct follow on from The Disappearing City and a signed true first edition can be worth between $1500-$2000.

Lloyd Wright, Frank. The Japanese Print, An Interpretation, Seymour (1912). Seymour (1912). 50 copies of the deluxe edition

Lloyd Wright, Frank. The Life Work of the American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright. C.A. Mees (1925). seven special numbers of the art magazine Wendingen

Lloyd Wright, Frank. Modern Architecture, Being the Kahn Lectures for 1930. Princeton University Press (1931).

Lloyd Wright, Frank. The Architectural Forum, January 1938. (1938).

Lloyd Wright, Frank. A Taliesin Square-Paper, A Nonpolitical Voice from our Democratic Minority. The Taliesin Press (1949).

Lloyd Wright, Frank. Taliesin Drawings, Recent Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright Selected from His Drawings. Wittenborn, Schultz (1952). Sixth volume of the series "Problems of Contemporary Art."

Lloyd Wright, Frank. Drawings for a Living Architecture. Horizon Press (1959).

Lloyd Wright, Frank. Building Plans and Designs. Horizon Press (1963). 2600 copies

Lloyd Wright, Frank. The Japanese Print, An Interpretation Horizon Press (1967). Horion Press (1967). collection of Japanese Prints chosen by Frank Lloyd Wright

Lloyd Wright, Frank. Frank Lloyd Wright Selected Drawing Portfolio, Vol I-III. Horizon Press (1980). 700 copies; color reproductions of 50 Wright drawings

Lloyd Wright, Frank. Volume 12, In His Renderings, 1887-1959. ADA Edita (1984). all of Wright's perspective renderings during this period

Lloyd Wright, Frank. Volume 5, Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph: 1924-1936. ADA Edita (1985).